• baclofen user reviews baclofen buy uk propranolol recreational metronidazole expiration ciprofloxacin for sinus infection
  • acyclovir 200 mg capsule http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...ney-stones disulfiram for sale topiramate 25 mg tablet sulfamethoxazole 800mg trimethoprim 160mg
    http://innovezdanslesimplants....page=17678 cialis achat en ligne canada prix levitra boite 12 vente levitra en ligne cialis 20mg prix en pharmacie en france viagra piller pris levitra genericos viagra generika http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/sismo...ne-vendita ou trouver cialis aller ici suivant comprar levitra online http://logement-jeunes.aquitai...-bestellen

    Archive for the ‘applesauce’ Category

    Healthify Your Baked Goods!

    toolsI find that certain weekend mornings are practically tailor-made for a muffin-and-coffee breakfast.

    Sipping freshly brewed coffee and biting into homemade baked good on a cloudy autumn morning, watching the colorful foliage slowly float down from tree branches, is simultaneously comforting and delectable.

    While many commercial baked goods are nutrition horror cliches (copious amounts of white flour, sugar, and unhealthy fats), homemade varieties can get a nutritional boost in a variety of ways.

    These tips can be used when making muffins, brownies, and cookies:

    1) Go whole or go home

    Gone are the days when “whole grain baked goods” meant a dense, rubbery concoction akin to an E-Z Bake Oven creation.

    The key to making light and fluffy 100% whole grain baked goods is to utilize either whole wheat pastry flour or whole wheat white flour.

    You can fully replace a recipe’s white flour with either of these varieties.

    Not only will the end result be higher in fiber, it will also contain more selenium, magnesium, phosphorus, and potassium.

    2) Go alternative

    Alternative flours can be quite pricey, but they’re a lot more affordable if you make them yourself!

    Instead of purchasing oat flour (which, depending where you live, can be hard to track down), make your own by processing quick oats in a food processor.

    FYI: One and a half cups of quick cooking oats yields one cup of oat flour.

    Oat flour is high in soluble fiber (the kind that helps lower cholesterol and provides a feeling of fullness more quickly) and rich in phytonutrients.

    One other FYI: oat flour can only replace, at most, half of the wheat flour in a given recipe.

    Another favorite alternative flour of mine is almond meal.

    You can also make this at home by pulverizing raw almonds in a food processor or coffee grinder until they achieve a powdery consistency.

    Like oat flour, almond meal can replace up to half of the wheat flour in a given recipe.

    Like whole almonds, almond meal is a good source of fiber, protein, vitamin E, and heart-healthy monounsaturated fats.

    You can even replace half a cup of flour in a recipe with half a cup of pure wheat germ for added fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

    3) Get saucy

    Unsweetened applesauce is a healthy baker’s ally.

    You can replace anywhere from one half to three quarters of the fat called for in a recipe with unsweetened applesauce and no one will be the wiser.

    The applesauce won’t disrupt flavors, but will add plenty of moisture to your baked goods.

    4) Sprinkle away

    Whenever I make pancake or muffin batter, I like to add two or three tablespoons of oat bran and ground flaxseeds.

    Not only do they impart a hearty and nutty flavor, they also add extra nutrition in a pinch.

    5) Sugar?  Think Beyond The White Stuff

    When it comes to sweetening, think natural first.

    Raisins, blueberries, bananas, and fresh pineapple add sweetness — and great flavor — to recipes while also delivering nutrition.

    In my experience, you can halve the added sugar (whether in the form of white sugar, brown sugar, agave nectar, maple syrup, etc.) in conventional recipes and still have a tasty baked good.

    When reducing sugar, make up for it by adding nutmeg, cinnamon, and vanilla, almond, and/or coconut extract to the batter.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Applesauce

    applesauce3What is your take on applesauce?  Can I count a half cup serving as one of my fruits for the day?

    — Julia Larson
    Philadelphia, PA

    It’s somewhere in between drinking apple juice and biting into a whole apple.

    Since apples are boiled prior to becoming applesauce, levels of vitamin C and B vitamins are significantly reduced.

    Even within the applesauce world, there are variations.

    On the “less healthy side” you have applesauce made from peeled apples that also tacks on added sugar.

    On the healthier side, you have homemade applesauce made from unpeeled apples and flavored with spices, as opposed to sugar.

    Remember, half the fiber — and a large number of antioxidants and phytonutrients — is found in the apple peel!

    The other issue with applesauce is that, due to its texture and lack of necessary chewing, it can be very simple to down tablespoon after tablespoon.

    The process of eating a whole apple is more time consuming and more satisfying from a psychological perspective.

    Final verdict: it’s fine.  Much better than drinking apple juice, but not quite as “two thumbs up” as eating a piece of whole fruit.

    Share

    • Search By Topic

    • Connect to Small Bites

    • Subscribe to Small Bites

    • Archives

      • 2017 (1)
      • 2013 (1)
      • 2012 (28)
      • 2011 (90)
      • 2010 (299)
      • 2009 (581)
      • 2008 (639)
      • 2007 (355)