• metronidazole online purchase levofloxacino 500 mg preço prednisolone 1 eye drops http://foggiachat.altervista.o...kwd=414599 topiramate pills
  • valacyclovir prescription azithromycin drug class http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...cephalexin baclofen opiate withdrawal http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...in-expired
    levitra sans ordonnance belgique cialis suisse sans ordonnance acheter cialis en ligne suisse levitra bayer belgique http://innovezdanslesimplants....age=714451 salud sexual viagra cialis http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/sismo...sin-receta viagra de hollande donde comprar viagra kamagra gel kaufen aller trouve toile http://logement-jeunes.aquitai...sin-receta voltaren patch acheter

    Archive for the ‘BPA’ Category

    You Ask, I Answer: Canned Tomatoes

    canned-tomatos-fbI read somewhere that consumers should stay away from canned tomatoes (in any form), and instead buy them in glass containers because the acid in the tomatoes leaches toxins from the tin.

    Is there any validity to this concern?

    — Katherine Baldwin
    (Location unknown)

    When Bisphenol A (BPA) concerns spread like wildfire slightly over a year ago following reports of negative consequences on endocrine, reproductive, and neurological health, one added detail was that when acidic foods are stored in cans that contain BPA, they absorb the chemical.

    That is most certainly a true statement.  As with anything else (i.e.: soda consumption), you need to consider context.

    For example, I use canned tomatoes no more than once a month, if that.  In that case, I don’t consider the “can versus glass” question of utmost importance.

    I know some people who cook with canned tomatoes at least three times a week.  In their case, I strongly recommend opting for glass jars whenever possible.

    I also recommend treading with more caution when it comes to foods consumed by toddlers, children, and pregnant women.

    FYI: Eden Foods canned tomato products are lined with enamel, rather than plastic, thereby significantly reducing the amount of BPA that leaches into their foods.  This is the company’s official statement:

    “Eden Organic Tomatoes are packed in lead free tin covered steel cans coated with a baked on r-enamel lining. Due to the acidity of tomatoes, the lining is epoxy based and may contain a minute amount of bisphenol-A, it is in the ‘non detectable’ range in extraction test. The test was based on a detection level at 5 ppb (parts per billion).”

    I suppose one then has to ask — “how safe is it to consume from cans with epoxy-based linings?”

    Once again, it comes down to context.

    Canned foods shouldn’t make up the bulk of the diet anyway, since most of these foods contain considerable amounts of sodium.

    PS: In some states, environmental committees have drafted bills to phase out — and eventually ban — the production (or at the very least, the sale) of cans that contain BPA.  I certainly support them!

    Share

    Bye Bye, Bisphenol-A

    102960With the recent concerns about Bisphenol-A, I thought it would be useful to notify you via this short post that Eden Organic canned goods do not contain the controversial chemical.

    I have come across their products at Whole Foods all throughout the Northeast as well as local health food stores throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn.

    In the off-chance that you can not find them where you live, their website hosts an online store.

    PS: if you come across any other companies that use Bisphenol-A free cans, please leave a comment and tell other Small Bites readers!

    Share

    • Search By Topic

    • Connect to Small Bites

    • Subscribe to Small Bites

    • Archives

      • 2017 (1)
      • 2013 (1)
      • 2012 (28)
      • 2011 (90)
      • 2010 (299)
      • 2009 (581)
      • 2008 (639)
      • 2007 (355)