http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/?size=323999&pr... acyclovir sur le comptoir bactrim prix
maxalt mg 
combivent sin receta 
http://www.smwc.edu/?size=569736&price=5... 
cialis 
kamagra lowest price 
cheapest cialis 
nizoral sans recette http://www.scripts.com/?q=1&prod=&type=2... http://www.scripts.com/?q=1&prod=&type=2... http://crown.kings.edu/?size=131793&pric... http://crown.kings.edu/?size=160434&pric... prezzi viagra farmacia
http://www.dril-quip.com/cgi-bin/associa... 
http://www.dril-quip.com/cgi-bin/associa... 
super kamagra preisvergleich 
tadalafil avis cialis sur internet avis http://www.cc-guingamp.fr/stat/glam/inde...
  • finasteride 1mg cialis preis frankreich accutane 10 mg

  • Archive for the ‘calcium’ Category

    Fail! US News & World Report on Dairy-Free Calcium-Rich Foods

    I was hopeful when I initially came across the headline for a recent article in US News & World Report — “5 Non-Dairy Foods With Calcium”.

    “Finally,” I thought, “a well-read magazine informing its readers that calcium is not a synonym for dairy.”

    Then I started reading the story. And groaned. Repeatedly.

    Much like their ridiculous “healthiest diets” article from last year (see my critique here), factual errors, misleading statements, and unhelpful information abound in this piece.

    Below, the five worst tidbits that perpetuate incorrect information:

    Continue Reading »

    Share

    Subway’s New Fortified Breads: A Good Source of “Healthwashing”

    Last week, while the new and “healthier” Happy Meals captured the attention of the nutrition and public health world, the folks at Subway quietly announced their latest “commitment to nutrition” — breads fortified with calcium and vitamin D. In brief, “now, each 6-inch serving of bread in the 24,000-plus U.S. restaurants provides 30 percent of the daily recommended value of calcium and 20 percent of the daily recommended value of vitamin D.”

    Continue Reading »

    Share

    Beyond Milk: There’s Much More To Bone Health than Calcium and Vitamin D

    Those of you who follow me on Twitter (or read my tidbits on Facebook regularly) know my stance on milk — yes, it is a good source of calcium and vitamin D (though, remember, milk in the US contains vitamin D because it is mandated by law; in many other countries, milk is devoid of the sunshine vitamin), but not the best source; it also lacks many nutrients that are crucial for healthy bones.

    Too often, conversations and debates on the nutritional “worth” of milk turn into a “cows” versus “soybeans” face-off or, if it’s slightly more advanced, “cows” versus all the available milk alternatives (soy, almond, coconut, hemp, oat, and hazelnut).

    As far as calcium is concerned, fortified foods and beverages contain calcium that is just as absorbable as — and in some cases, more absorbable than — the calcium in milk.  In other words — the added calcium in soy or almond milk is just as good for your bones as the one in cow’s milk (or any other animal’s milk, for that matter).

    Unlike the vast majority of nutrients, which only work effectively within their respective food matrices (i.e.: vitamin E, which needs to work with other antioxidants that are present in the foods it is in to do its job properly), calcium’s health benefits are equally derived from food or supplementation.

    Vitamin D is fortified in dairy and non-dairy milks.  Besides, in order to consume the high amounts we now know are needed for overall health (not just bone health), supplementation is a must.

    In order to truly tackle the topic of bone health, though, we need to go beyond the calcium and vitamin D content of milk and its vegan analogues and instead identify all the nutrients that play important roles in bone health.  In doing so, we find that milk is far from the king of the bone health hill.

    Continue Reading »

    Share

    Chocolate Milk: Muscle Nectar? Weight-Loss Secret? Neither.

    Pick up any fitness magazine and you will see the virtues of chocolate milk extolled away, often times classified as the best thing you can drink after a workout. Over the past few years, chocolate milk has even been touted as a heart-healthy beverage (alas, a careful reading of the studies proves otherwise).

    For some odd reason, a May 2010 article titled “The Chocolate Milk Diet” penned by Men’s Health editor-in-chief David Zinczenko was shared by a handful of people on my Facebook feed today.   I should note that despite having no background or credentials in nutrition science or health, Yahoo! Health identifies Mr. Zinczenko as a “health expert”.

    If you are a new Small Bites reader, you should know that I have my share of — pardon the pun — beef with Men’s Health (for their ridiculous attacks on soy, their mixed messages, their condoning of ice cream, soda, and beer following a workout, and for the horrible underlying message behind their popular “Eat This, Not That” book series).

    This particular article gushes endlessly about the many virtues of chocolate milk, mainly weight loss and muscle-building.  Although I shared the article on Twitter earlier today (prefacing the link with “Today’s daily dose of nonsense, courtesy of Men’s Health“), I felt the need to explain, in detail, my frustrations with it.

    These sorts of articles irritate me to the extent they do because not only are they are read by millions, but they are presented as legitimate, objective, trust-worthy nutritional science, when that is not always the case.

    Now, let’s tackle this piece — bit by bit.

    Continue Reading »

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Calcium Absorption, Kidney Stone Risk, and Gelatin-Free Vitamin D Supplements

    0904-calcium-supplements1. Is there research that indicates that calcium carbonate’s absorption is superior to that of calcium citrate?

    2. My doctor recently suggested that I supplement my diet with calcium and vitamin D. Is there a heightened risk of developing kidney stones associated with calcium supplementation?

    3. Most of the vitamin D supplements I’ve found contain gelatin as an ingredient. Do you know of any alternative products?

    – Josh Griffin
    (Location Unknown)

    Continue Reading »

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Calcium Carbonate in Vegan Beverages

    Tums UltraI’ve noticed that most soy/almond milk has calcium carbonate, which someone once told me was like drinking concrete?

    Is that true?  What is calcium carbonate, exactly?

    – Kerra Olsen
    (Via Facebook)

    Calcium carbonate– an ionic salt –  is a very abundant compound; it’s found almost everywhere in nature, from snail shells to our planet’s crust.  It’s also the main component in Tums!

    Yes, concrete (and chalk) are made from calcium carbonate, but that is not to say you are “eating concrete”.  After all, you can make paper mache paste from flour and water.  That does not mean, however, that a whole grain baguette is just a baked version of of it.

    Most calcium supplements (and calcium-fortified foods, such as non-dairy “milks”) are made from calcium carbonate because it is the least expensive source.  Research also shows that its absorption is the highest.

    Since calcium carbonate is best absorbed with meals, it only makes sense to use it to fortify foods.

    No reason to panic or fear.  Calcium carbonate is a perfectly safe way to get your calcium, provided you don’t have certain conditions (kidney stones being the biggest worry).

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: “Greek-Style” Yogurt

    JF08_IO5aI’m a little afraid to ask you this, but here it goes.

    I have noticed that some Greek yogurts actually say “Greek style” on their packaging (with the word “style” in tiny letters).  I’ve been reading your blog for a while, so I have a feeling this is significant.

    Are these different from (or less healthy than) a “real” Greek yogurt like Fage?

    – Melissa Heaney
    Albany, NY

    Ah, the drawbacks of being a sharp-eyed nutrition sleuth at the grocery store.

    I recall several years ago, when I first started reading ingredient lists for common brands I used to buy, walking around supermarket aisles in a heavy-hearted daze.  It was almost as if I had just been told that my significant other had been cheating on me on a daily basis.  Except that, rather than stumbling across a hurriedly-scribbled name and number on a piece of paper, I was alerted to the presence of artificial dyes, partially hydrogenated oils, and high fructose corn syrup.  Heartbreak on aisle five!

    Onto your question — there is a difference between Greek-style yogurts and actual Greek yogurts.  If you’re curious about what makes Greek yogurt special, please read this post.

    Here is the ingredient list for Fage non-fat Greek yogurt:

    Grade A Pasteurized Skimmed Milk, Live Active Yogurt Cultures (L. Bulgaricus, S. Thermophilus)

    Now, let’s take a peek at the ingredient list for a Greek-style yogurt.  For this example, I am using The Greek Gods brand:

    Pasteurized Grade A Nonfat Milk, Inulin, Pectin, Active Cultures (S. Thermophilius, L. Bulgaricus, L. Acidophilus, Bifidobacterium, L. Casei)

    Whereas “true” Greek yogurt’s thick consistency is the result of straining out the watery whey, Greek-style yogurts add thickeners (ie: gum blends like pectin and inulin, milk solids, stabilizers).

    Each yogurt’s respective Nutrition Facts label also tells the tale.  Here is what 6 ounces of real Greek yogurt offer:

    • 90 calories
    • 0 grams fiber
    • 15 grams protein
    • 19% of the Adequate Intake of calcium

    That same amount of Greek-style yogurt contains:

    • 60 calories
    • 2 grams fiber
    • 6 grams protein
    • 25% of the Adequate Intake of calcium

    Let’s make sense of that.

    • The decrease in calories is due to the reduction in protein.  Remember, Greek yogurt’s higher protein levels are due to the absence of watery whey.  Greek-style yogurt retains the whey and adds on thickeners.
    • As you know, all dairy products are fiberless.  The 2 grams of fiber in Greek-style yogurt are due to the presence of thickening gums.  Depending on what other brands of Greek-style yogurt use, the fiber value may be zero.
    • The higher percentage of calcium is also attributed to the presence of whey.

    There is nothing troubling, disturbing, or unhealthy about pectin and inulin.  We aren’t talking about blue dyes or trans fats here.  Two FYIs, though:

    1. For optimal health benefits, fiber should come from foods that naturally contain it, rather than add-ons.
    2. If you’re looking for the higher protein benefits of Greek yogurt (mainly the ability to feel satiated for a little longer), reach for the authentic product.
    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Calcium From Fish

    ID79601I’ve learned tons about nutrition from you!  One of the things I’m glad I now know is that spinach isn’t a good source of calcium because it is high in oxalates (and you’re right, a lot of nutritionists get that wrong!).

    What about calcium in canned salmon and sardines?  Is that pretty easy for the body to absorb?

    – Jessica Unter
    (City Withheld), TX

    Sardines — and canned salmon, for that matter — lack compounds that interfere with calcium absorption.  Much like dark, leafy green vegetables (kale, mustard greens, bok choy, and collard greens) and tofu, sardines are a great calcium source for anyone who is lactose intolerant or has a milk allergy.

    Diets very high in total protein can affect calcium levels, but that does not mean a food high in protein has that effect.

    Three ounces of sardines contribute a third of the daily value of calcium.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Extra Calcium for “Backup”?

    1446956_f260As you’ve discussed in previous posts, phosphoric acid, caffeine, and sodium inhibit calcium absorption and/or promote calcium excretion.

    Guidelines state that the body can only utilize 500 mg of calcium at a time.

    That said, would extra calcium (beyond 500 mg) at a meal blunt the detrimental effects of phosphorus, caffeine, and sodium that are consumed concurrently?

    – Megan Smith
    Lubbock, TX

    Great question!

    In theory, yes, extra calcium would blunt the effects of the components you mention.

    Semantics is key here.  The body can utilize 500 milligrams of absorbable calcium.

    A cup of cooked spinach, for example, contains 245 milligrams of calcium.  Due to spinach’s high oxalic acid content, only five percent of that calcium (12 milligrams) are absorbed.

    Hence, someone would need to eat 41 cups of spinach (10,045 milligrams of its calcium) to get 500 milligrams of absorbable calcium.

    So, technically speaking, extra calcium does blunt the effects.  However, once the body absorbs 500 “true” milligrams of calcium, extra milligrams become irrelevant.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Calcium in Sesame Seeds?

    SesameSeedsI have come across conflicting information on sesame seeds as a good source of calcium.

    Some websites (none written by nutritionists) claim they are, others claim they are not.  A few vegan websites I’ve been to [refer to] them as “calcium superstar” or a “calcium powerhouse”.

    So, do you get calcium from these tasty seeds or not?

    – Evan Raggio
    (City Withheld)

    You do, but not as much as some uninformed individuals may lead you to believe.

    Describing sesame seeds as a “calcium powerhouse” is incorrect.  In the non-dairy world, that superlative is better suited to kale and mustard greens.

    There are two important factors to keep in mind about calcium and sesame seeds.

    Number one: unhulled sesame seeds (ones which contain the hull) contain more calcium than hulled sesame seeds (ones without the hull).

    Whereas one tablespoon of unhulled sesame seeds delivers nine percent of the Daily Value of calcium, that same amount of hulled sesame seeds delivers four percent.

    You may think, “alright, so I’ll just eat unhulled sesame seeds, and make tahini from them as well!”

    Here’s the other issue — unhulled sesame seeds contain a large amount of oxalates.

    Oxalates severely restrict calcium absorption.  Spinach is also very high in oxalates, which is why it is not a good source of calcium (I am flabbergasted by the amount of articles I have seen written by Registered Dietitians which tout spinach as an “excellent source of calcium” — it is NOT!).

    So, while you do get some calcium from sesame seeds, they are certainly not a powerhouse or an “excellent source”.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Greek Yogurt

    fage-greek-yogurtI know Greek yogurt is thicker and firmer than regular yogurt, but are there any nutritional differences between the two?

    – Julie Abdir
    Keene, NH

    Yes, slight ones.

    Greek yogurt is thicker and creamier than regular yogurt (even in its fat-free version) because the watery whey is strained out.  This straining process also makes Greek yogurt higher in protein and lower in calcium than regular yogurt.

    Whereas a cup of regular yogurt delivers 13 grams of protein and 450 milligrams of calcium, that same amount of Greek yogurt adds up to 20 grams of protein and 150 milligrams of calcium.

    Another bonus?  Since Greek yogurt is highly concentrated, it delivers a higher amount of probiotics than regular yogurt.  Remember, though, you always want look for the “Live & Active Cultures” seal to make sure you are getting beneficial bacteria.

    Keep the same #1 yogurt guideline in mind when buying Greek varieties: buy the plain flavor and jazz it up yourself in healthy ways (i.e.: add dried or fresh fruit, nuts, ground flax, oat bran, etc.).

    If you’re not into traditional yogurt consumption, try using Greek yogurt (0% or 2% fat) as a substitute for sour cream in a savory dip.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Calcium & Magnesium

    500_T1_W275_HThere are supplements that contain both calcium and magnesium, and yet I have read articles which suggest that these two minerals do not combine well and “compete” in order to enter cells.

    Can you shed some light on this contradiction?

    – Beth Guy
    Portland, ME

    Gladly.

    Calcium and magnesium actually work in tandem in many ways.  That said, they also compete for absorption from receptors.  Consider them “frienemies”!

    Competition for absorption is only a problem, though, when calcium to magnesium ratios are disproprotioante.

    The ideal ratio for their consumption in one food or meal is 2:1 (calcium: magnesium).  Dairy products, for example, generally offer a 10:1 ratio.  Therefore, diets high in dairy can negatively impact magnesium absorption.

    This, by the way, helps to explain why despite having some of the highest dairy intakes of the world, the United States also has such high rates of osteoporosis (remember, magnesium is key to bone health!).

    If you’re buying a calcium supplement that also offers magnesium, make sure there’s a 2:1 ratio going on.  So, a 500 milligram calcium supplement should offer 250 milligrams of magnesium.  If it only offers 50 milligrams, put it back on the shelf.

    Share

    Who Said It?: Reveal

    QuestionMark-300x2991Spinach is full of pleasant surprises [and a top-ten "power food"].  It’s a natural source of iron… and a rich non-dairy source of calcium.

    Those sentences appear in The Sonoma Diet, penned by Registered Dietitian Connie Guttersen.

    I find it incomprehensible that a Registered Dietitian can make such an elementary mistake.

    Although spinach offers plenty of vitamins, antioxidants, and phytonutrients, it is not a rich source of iron or calcium.

    Unlike other leafy greens (i.e.: bok choy, broccoli, mustard greens, and kale) which are very good sources of both those minerals, spinach is loaded with compouds known as oxalates.

    Oxalates bind to iron and calcium, significantly decreasing absorption of those minerals in our digestive systems.

    Consider the following:

    • A half cup of cooked Chinese cabbage delivers as much calcium as a cup of milk
    • One and a quarter cups of cooked bok choy deliver as much calcium as a cup of milk
    • Eight cups of cooked spinach deliver as much calcium as a cup of milk

    What makes this tricky is that the figures presented for spinach in terms of iron and calcium content do not take into account decreased absorption.  Therefore, you will see that a half cup of cooked spinach “provides” 115 milligrams of calcium (11% of the Daily Value).  Sadly, we only absorb 10 to 15% of that amount.

    Please share this tidbit with as many people as you can.  I am continually amazed by the amount of health professionals (dietitians, doctors, and educators) who keep this myth alive.

    Share

    Who Said It?

    QuestionMark-300x299Spinach is full of pleasant surprises [and a top-ten "power food"].  It’s a natural source of iron… and a rich non-dairy source of calcium.

    Yikes!  Come back on Wednesday to find out who apparently didn’t pay much attention during the vitamins and minerals lesson in nutrition class…

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Tempeh vs. Tofu

    Sliced_tempehIn some of your posts, you have mentioned that tempeh (pictured, left) is more nutritious than tofu.

    Is that just because tempeh is fermented, or are there more reasons?

    – Sarah Bertanke
    (Location withheld)

    While tempeh’s fermentation process certainly gives it a nutritional (and probiotic!) boost, there is more to this tale.

    FYI: Fermentation reduces soybeans’ phytate content, thereby making their zinc and iron much more bioavailable.

    Whereas tofu is made by coagulating soy milk with a precipitating agent (in most cases calcium sulfate, thus the high amounts of calcium in tofu), tempeh is made from whole soybeans.

    The presence of said soybeans — in some cases along with wild rice or flax — makes tempeh a high-fiber food.

    While four ounces of tofu provides 1.5 grams of fiber, that same amount of tempeh adds up to 11 grams!

    Due to its “whole food” status, tempeh is also an excellent source of manganese, magnesium, and potassium.

    Tempeh is also significantly higher in protein and omega-3 Alpha-Linolenic fatty acids than tofu.

    Although I enjoy the taste of both, I am partial to tempeh’s nutty flavors and unique mouth-feel.

    Share
    • Search By Topic

    • Connect to Small Bites

    • Subscribe to Small Bites

    • Archives

      • 2014 (1)
      • 2013 (1)
      • 2012 (29)
      • 2011 (91)
      • 2010 (300)
      • 2009 (581)
      • 2008 (639)
      • 2007 (355)