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    Archive for the ‘Celebrity Diet Secrets’ Category

    Celebrity Diet Secrets: But You DO Eat Carbs, Drew Carey!

    drew-carey-240Comedian and Price is Right host Drew Carey has shed 80 pounds over the past six months, and the folks at People are on the case.

    In an article titled “How I Lost 80 Lbs.”, Mr. Carey shares his tip for success:

    “No carbs,” Carey says. “I have cheated a couple times, but basically no carbs, not even a cracker. No bread at all. No pizza, nothing. No corn, no beans, no starches of any kind. Egg whites in the morning or like, Greek yogurt, cut some fruit.”

    Alas, Mr. Carey has fallen prey to the same type of erroneous thinking that many other dieters do — the idea that “carbs” and “starch” are the same thing.  They are not.

    Remember, carbohydrates are in every food (except for oils, solid fats, and animal protein).  Yes, everything else — from almonds to yogurt to fruit to sweet potatoes to broccoli — contains carbohydrates.

    The notion that Drew Carey lost weight while “shunning carbohydrates” is wrong since he then states that he would sometimes start his mornings with yogurt and fruit.

    Besides, it is absolutely possible to lose weight while eating carbohydrate-rich foods like oatmeal, quinoa, lentils, and chickpeas.

    I also have no doubt that a quick comparison of Mr. Carey’s caloric consumption before and during this diet would also show a decrease in total calories.  Of course, the key to successful weight loss is to cut calories without sacrificing satiety and nutrient intake.

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    Celebrity Diet Secrets: Beth Ostrosky

    holidaybethhoward1-170x224What would the start of a new year be without celebrity weight-loss tips?

    This time around, it’s Beth Ostrosky (AKA Howard Stern’s wife), who tells OK! magazine that the key is to exercise more and completely give up sweets.

    Ms. Ostrosky tells OK! that “literally from [the moment I gave up sweets], my body has completely changed. I dropped six pounds in the first week.”

    Considering her previous dietary habits, it’s no surprise she has lost weight.

    Not only were Swedish Fish, Starburst and Hot Tamales dietary staples — she would also admittedly pop 15 Toostie Rolls as a pre-running snack!

    Newsflash: that’s a total of 750 calories.  Since sugar does absolutely nothing to help satiate us, you are looking at 750 calories that don’t make you feel full!

    Despite Ms. Ostrosky’s claims that she can now eat unlimited quantities of foods (she claims to eat a bagel for breakfast, “a lot of bread” with lunch, and “a big pasta dinner” regularly) because she no longer includes sugar in her diet, we are looking at the tried- and-true, yet always effective, “eat less, move more” strategy.

    Also, someone may want to inform Ms. Ostrosky that Starbucks uses vanilla soymilk (which contains a tablespoon of added sugar per cup) in its soy lattes.  Those are not sugar-free beverages!

    Thanks to Jessica Rothschild for forwarding me the OK! article.

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    Celebrity Diet Secrets: Liz Hurley Pinpoints The Cause of Bloating… NOT!

    VNSAYM3elizabeth_hurleyMany thanks to Small Bites reader Sara Zuba for forwarding along this article from London’s Daily Mail newspaper, which details actress Elizabeth Hurley’s “diet secrets”.

    For starters?  In order to “keep her famously svelte figure,” Hurley now opts for vodka and seltzer over white wine.

    Mind you, she doesn’t “like vodka that much” and thinks it initially “tastes like medicine”, but anything to look svelte, right?  Insert eyeroll HERE.

    Not to mention, the caloric difference between a vodka drink and a glass of wine isn’t exactly earth-shattering.

    A 1.5 ounce serving of vodka with whatever amount of seltzer water she’s adding contains 103 calories.

    A 5-ounce serving of wine, meanwhile, provides 120 calories.

    We’re talking about 17 fewer calories — the amount found in two cashews.

    She then pulls this bit of nutrition advice from seemingly out of thin air:

    “‘I used to drink an awful lot of coffee, but I was told after the age of 40 you have to be careful with coffee and wine.  Apparently, that can be one of the reasons older women get bloated around their stomach.”

    Absolutely untrue.  There is nothing intrinsic in coffee that promotes bloating or the collection of adipose tissue around the stomach area.

    Perhaps the most disturbing — and, sad, really — part of the article is this reference to something Hurley said back in 2002:

    “Following the birth of [her 7-year-old son] Damian, she revealed how she only eats one meal a day and often goes to bed hungry”

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    Celebrity Diet Secrets: A Steaming Pile Of… Goop

    Last September, Gwyneth Paltrow launched a lifestyle and wellness website named Goop, which she describes as a “collection of experiences [of] what makes life good.”

    Well, wouldn’t you know it, in her latest newsletter, “Gwyn” talks about… detox diets!

    “I like to do fasts and detoxes a couple of times during the year, the most hardcore one being the Master Cleanse I did last spring,” she writes.

    Turns out the the A-lister’s detox specialist — who I refuse to name in this post since I do not want to promote him with yet another Google hit — told her the Master Cleanse wasn’t healthy because it doesn’t adequately meet the liver’s nutritional demands.

    Forget the liver, how about the fact that it simply doesn’t provide much of anything in the way of nutrition and that there is absolutely no reason to believe that lemon juice, maple syrup, and cayenne pepper play any role in detoxing?

    I digress.

    Gwyneth then proceeds to share her own “detox-doctor approved” seven-day elimination diet to “help decrease the amount of work your digestive system has to do.”

    If it’s any consolation, she will “be suffering along with you to kickstart [her] year a bit lighter.”

    Before going into detail, she shares tips from her detox-doctor, including:

    “If your bowel movements get sluggish, you can accelerate things by drinking half a cup of castor oil or using a mild herbal laxative. Bowel elimination is paramount for correct detoxification.”

    Well, yes, bowel elimination is paramount to overall good health, as it is one of the body’s ways of removing waste material.

    That said, the castor oil and herbal laxative suggestions are ridiculous and, in my opinion, are tacked on in an attempt to make this detox plan seem special.

    Whatever happened to simply speeding up digestive transit by consuming a higher quantity of fiber-rich foods?

    Anyhow, you can see Gwyneth’s week-long detox plan here. Disturbingly, the average day barely adds up to 1,000 calories!

    For the record, “there can be no dairy, grains with gluten, meat, shellfish, anything processed (including all soy products), fatty nuts, nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and eggplant), condiments, sugar and obviously no alcohol, caffeine or soda.”

    Which makes me wonder:

    * What are examples of non fatty nuts?
    * What about those four nightshade vegetables makes them detox “enemies”? I would just love to hear her “detox doctor” explain this one.
    * If sugar is banned for this plan, then why is the Master Cleanse — which calls for cups and cups of maple syrup (sugar!) — considered such a pinnacle of health?
    * If dairy is banned, why do some of Gwynth’s recipes call for whey protein powder?
    * If sugar is banned, why do some of Gwyneth’s recipes call for agave nectar?
    * If “anything processed” is banned, why is almond milk used in some recipes?

    Above all, why do celebrities with no health credentials think they are authorities on nutrition?

    Thank you to Kristin MacBride for passing along the newsletter link.

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    Say What?/Celebrity Diet Secrets: Teri Hatcher

    One of the country’s most famous desperate housewives recently shared some of the images and phrases on her “goal board” (described by Ms. Hatcher as “a collage of images of things you want to achieve in your life… all written, glued or drawn onto a big piece of paper.”)

    Among that inspirational collage? “Don’t eat after 7 PM.”

    Uh oh, looks like the “calorie clock” myth is back!

    Truth is, calories couldn’t care less what time they are consumed.

    A 600 calorie ice cream sundae will provide 600 calories whether it’s gobbled down for breakfast or at 10 PM.

    Let me just say that not eating after 7 PM will very likely result in some weight loss.

    However, this is very simply due to a reduction in total daily caloric intake (rather than avoiding food after an arbitrary bewitching hour where calories are multiplied by twenty!)

    I’m more disturbed by the notion that refusing food after 7 PM is someone’s life goal.

    I would have gone with “develop a healthy attitude towards food.”

    Represented by an illustration of someone happily savoring one (there’s the key!) decadent dark chocolate truffle.

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    Celebrity Diet Secrets: Britney Spears

    I could care less how a celebrity dresses on the red carpet or how their hair looks when they’re buying Advil at their local drugstore at 1 AM.

    I do, however, like to keep tabs on what they are telling the media about nutrition and health.

    Not so much because I think I’ll stumble upon some revolutionary new concept, but because many times their eating habits and “tips” — which many people often apply to their own lives — are far off the mark.

    Take Britney Spears’ latest statement to OK! Magazine:

    I’m the healthiest I’ve been all my life.

    My diet has a lot to do with my getting into shape. I have no sugar. I don’t eat fruit or even fruit juice because of the sugar.

    I eat chicken and salmon and rice. I eat avocados. I’ll have egg whites for breakfast and sometimes turkey burgers for lunch. I try to do just 1,200 calories a day. It may sound like it’s not much, but it’s actually a lot of food if you eat the right things.”

    Some of those concepts are NOT OK with me.

    Let’s start with the positives. She has clearly realized that a daily intake of Cheetos and Frappuccinos won’t do much to help her get back in shape.

    Additionally, avocados and salmon are a great way to get healthy fats.

    Now, onto the “not so great” attributes.

    I’d like to think Britney is pointing out just a few of the foods she eats, rather than her daily staples. Otherwise, she is on the fast track to boredom with such a small selection.

    And, hello, where’s the fiber?

    My main frustration, however, stems from her claim that, in order to keep a sugar-free diet, Britney has cut out fruits and fruit juice.

    Fruit juice, I can understand. After all, most fruit juices are simply sugar (in this case, fructose) water with vitamins. Since they are in liquid form, they don’t do much in terms of satiety, either.

    But giving up fruit? I can’t think of any reason to do that.

    Think about it for a minute. Doesn’t it sound slightly ridiculous to say, “I’m eating healthy, so no more fruit in MY fridge!”?

    A medium sized apple only contains 90 calories, but also provides fiber, phytonutrients, and a variety of vitamins.

    Please don’t mistake that recent study about fructose intake and weight gain to mean you should never have fruit.

    The fiber in whole fruit offsets the sharp rise in blood glucose you get when you drink pure fruit juice juice.

    Besides, a whole orange provides significantly lower levels of fructose than a glass of OJ.

    So, Britney, please don’t fear. A banana in the morning or some kiwi in the afternoon will not lead you astray.

    Thank you to reader Kristin MacBride for sending along Britney’s quote.

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    Celebrities — They’re Just Like Us! They Follow Senseless Fad Diets!

    During a long wait at the doctor’s office today I picked up a recent issue of Us Weekly.

    Lo and behold, I came across this weight-loss piece.

    Turns out that former dancer Tracy Anderson — who now trains Madonna and Gwyneth Paltrow; the three are pictured alongside this post — has created a “perfectly healthy” (her words, not mine) diet plan that promises a net loss of 20 pounds in just 6 weeks.

    Anderson claims that “signature strategy” helps women achieve the “teeny-tiny dancer type” body so many of them desire.

    Allow me to pull out my huge red flag.

    Anything that promises readers to achieve a dancer’s physique should make your BS detectors light up.

    Talk about unrealistic expectations! Dancers achieve their bodies through years of intense training.

    Let’s not forget, too, that the dance world has very high rates of eating disorders. That figure is not just about eating grilled salmon and steamed veggies for dinner every night.

    Someone carrying 50 extra pounds on their frame who does not exercise regularly should not be promised such an unrealistic result.

    Oh, but wait, that’s right — Anderson claims to have independently tested 100 women (what a conveniently round number!) over the past 5 years.

    Therefore she must know what she’s talking about, right? Wrong.

    Her “signature strategy” is nothing more than an alarmingly drastic caloric reduction (which we’ll get to in a bit).

    The plan strictly forbids processed foods, dairy, and spices. Red flag number TWO.

    Anderson, who as far as I know is not a registered dietitian and has not studied nutrition, claims that dairy and spices result in bloating and upset the digestive system, thereby resulting in fat storage.

    If she DID study nutrition, where did she get her degree? Bizarro University?

    Spices are wonderfully healthy — they offer a variety of nutrients, antioxidants, and phytochemicals.

    Furthermore, there is absolutely no evidence linking spices to bloating or fat storage.

    As for dairy, unless someone is lactose intolerant, I don’t see any reason for avoiding it, particularly fat-free dairy, which is a wonderful source of protein and calcium.

    The second week of the plan mostly eliminates snacks, leaving dieters with three paltry meals.

    One Wednesday, for instance, suggests:

    BREAKFAST

    1 cup nonfat rice milk
    1 poached egg

    LUNCH

    1 slice whole wheat toast
    2 strips veggie bacon
    1/2 cup tomatoes
    1/2 cup spinach

    DINNER

    3 – 5 oz. grilled seabass
    1/2 cup steamed spinach

    That adds up to approximately 850 calories! Well, yeah, you’re bound to lose weight when you basically starve yourself.

    Whatever happened to that “perfectly healthy” quote? This is anything but.

    As far as I’m concerned, anyone telling you to eat sushi rolls without soy sauce needs to have their head checked (not to mention, why is sushi part of a plan that only allows whole grains?).

    I know people do not turn to Us Weekly for the latest in health and nutrition research, but there needs to be some accountability here.

    A meal plan such as this one — very low in calories and nutrients — should not be glamorized. This is basically a semi-starvation diet with two big celebrity names attached.

    The three meals listed above contribute approximately 10 grams of fiber — less than half a day’s worth!

    That day’s worth of food only offers one serving of whole grains, very little vitamin E, not enough potassium, very little calcium, no Omega-3’s…. I could go on and on.

    As much as it often irritates me, I can accept the fact that celebrity mags will never shed the weight-loss pieces (they entice a lot of readers at the newsstand), but is too much to ask that they turn to respectable sources, like Registered Dietitians?

    Or, at the very least, do 2 minutes of fact checking on whatever meal plan is being offered?

    Donna Summer and Barbra Streisand were right — ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!

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    Celebrity Diet Secrets: Mariah Carey

    Us Weekly‘s feature on Mariah Carey’s “back to her teen body” diet left me thinking, “Forget copy editors. Magazines should really consider hiring nonsense editors.”

    As great as it is to have copy editors catch spelling, grammar, and syntax errors, someone needs to step in, look at nutrition-focused articles and say, “Are you KIDDING me?”

    Those are precisely the words I sighed when I read that Mariah’s diet (the one behind her “hotter-than-ever body”) “prohibits eating carbs and protein together.”

    Okay, first of all — Mariah is a megastar. Does she really need to pick up Suzanne Sommers’ weight-loss hand-me-downs to promote her new album?

    I was even more surprised to see a quote from Registered Dietitian — and New York University graduate — Keri Glassman apparently lending credibility to the silly idea of “food combining” by saying:

    “To digest [protein and carbohydrates] you need different enzymes. The theory is that if you eat them separately, you’ll break down more foods more effectively and increase weight loss.”

    It is my opinion — and sincere hope — that Glassman was merely asked what her thoughts about food combining diets were, and the magazine erroneously attributed her support to them.

    Anyway, it gets worse.

    We then get a sample of Mariah’s daily diet.

    First up — breakfast.

    On the menu? Plain yogurt, sliced fruit, and a banana.

    Is this a joke?

    Let’s go back a few lines and reread the following: “Carey’s diet prohibits eating carbs and protein together.”

    Yogurt contains protein AND carbohydrates. Hello???

    And this is no one-off typo.

    Her lunch also mixes protein (grilled chicken) with carbohydrates (zucchini, squash, and spinach). As it should!

    Food combining fanatics forget that the vast majority of foods are all a combination of fat, proteins, and carbohydrates.

    This is no secret — read any food label!

    You will see that pasta, milk, and bread contains carbs and protein.

    Chickpeas and kidney beans, meanwhile, contain fat, carbohydrates, and protein.

    The article finally — about fifteen paragraphs later — gets to Carey’s weight loss “secret”: cutting calories.

    Turns out she takes in approximately 1,000 – 1,200 calories a day and eats less of her greasy favorites like mac ‘n cheese and pizza.

    Oh, dear, how… how… common!

    I am increasingly becoming more irritated with the amount of deception and unnecessary complications surrounding weight loss and management in pop culture.

    I guess “cutting calories” isn’t A-list enough.

    Instead, people are bombarded with inane advice like count your carbs, don’t mix carbs with protein, get a coffee enema once a week, don’t eat after 6 p.m., sprout your chickpeas, eat only raw foods, eat nothing but red fruits on Mondays while standing on your head and wearing polka-dotted socks .

    Oh, please! Throw all that advice into the “macroneurotic” pile and start living life.

    I am not going to sit here and claim to know “a secret” to weight loss.

    I also refuse to start dictating obnoxiously high-maintenance rules you must follow to follow to achieve your weight and health goals.

    I believe a dietitian’s main responsibility is to help people develop strategies in order to make positive, feasible lifestyle changes. Nutrition is not — and should never become — a calculus 101 class with laws, rules, and inane theories.

    That said, I’m off to make dinner: Peanut-ginger tofu (protein!), sweet potatoes (carbs!), brown rice (more carbs!) and avocado (fat!)

    And I have the audacity to author a nutrition blog?

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    Celebrity Diet Secrets: Padma Lakshmi

    Supermodel and Top Chef host Padma Lakshmi tells Us Weekly that one of her beauty secrets is drinking three liters of water every day to maintain her perfect skin.

    “I pee a lot,” she comments.

    That’s an understatement!

    The “drink lots of water for your skin” myth is just as prevalent as the “drink eight glasses of water every day” one.

    For some reason, celebrity and beauty magazines fully embrace it.

    I suppose it provides Hollywood’s glitterati a “beauty tip” to always fall back on when the question comes up.

    Because, really, saying “kickass genes, expensive chemical peels, killer airbrushing, and a stylist at my beckon call” wouldn’t sit well with readers.

    Anyhow, allow me to explain why chugging water all day will not do much for your skin.

    Hydration levels of our skin are largely determined by the sebaceous glands, located on the dermis (the layer of skin right underneath the one visible to the eye).

    These glands are responsible for producing sebum, an oily, waxy-ish substance that helps protect water in our skin from evaporating.

    Not surprisingly, insufficient natural lubrication is one of the main causes of dry skin.

    External factors — harsh temperatures, air conditioning, heat (especially in winter months when we are cooped up indoors), exposure to the sun, showering too often, and soaps made with strong chemicals — decrease sebum production, as does aging.

    From a nutritional standpoint, significant deficiencies in Vitamin A are associated with dry skin.

    Drinking excessive amounts of water, however, is useless, as it will not penetrate the epidermis (the topmost layer of the skin), which is in need of excess hydration.

    Let me be clear here. Getting enough hydration is definitely important, but this can be from variety of fluids as well as water naturally found in foods.

    There is no need to chug down three extra liters of water every day.

    The best thing you can do for you skin is apply moisturizer on a daily basis, especially right after a shower (this helps lock in moisture).

    During winter months, humidifiers are also helpful in preventing overly dry indoor environment.

    Although a great beverage — and essential nutrient — water is not a drinkable skin miracle potion.

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    Celebrity Diet Secrets: Carnie Wilson

    One of my favorite parts of flying is buying a pile of celebrity tabloids at the terminal’s newsstand before boarding the plane.

    This week’s OK! is full of nutrition-related stories. Among them? Carnie Wilson’s new weight loss struggle.

    To recap: at her heaviest, the former Wilson Phillips member weighed 300 pounds.

    In 2000, she underwent gastric bypass surgery and slimmed down to 146 pounds.

    Now, eight years later, Carnie weighs 208 pounds.

    I can’t say I’m surprised. Most people who undergo gastric bypass are not addressing the real issue at hand.

    Controlling one’s weight isn’t solely about shrinking stomach capacity.

    Emotional eating, ingrained food patterns, and nutrition education also play a huge role in determining what, why, and how much we eat.

    This is why once gastric bypass is completed, patients tend to regain weight.

    Anyhow, in this interview, Carnie “vows” to shed the excess pounds she’s accumulated over the past few years.

    A sidebox details her new diet. The headline? “I’m not eating carbs.” Sigh.

    First of all, she IS eating carbs — as she should! — as evidenced by the fact that she consumes broccoli, asparagus, oranges, apples, and carrots.

    “Carbs” are not just donuts, Wonder bread, and cookies.

    In any case, Carnie goes on to say that if she “start[s] [her] morning with a piece of toast, [she’s] doomed for the day. It’s like, give me carbs,” she explains.

    And the problem with that would be, what, exactly?

    If she were to start her day with whole — or sprouted — grain toast, accompany her lunch with a small side dish of whole wheat pasta, and then snack on a little popcorn in the afternoon, what horrible thing will befall her?

    What’s most interesting is that Carnie appears to blame her weight gain on carbs, yet she admits that what made her gain weight in the past was “go[ing] through McDonalds drive-throughs and hav[ing] a Big Mac, Super Size fries, a 20-piece Chicken McNuggets, a pie and a shake” for one meal.

    She also points to being able to “eat a bag of M&M’s in one day“.

    So, really — and clearly — the issue was excess calories, not excess carbs.

    It always frustrates me to see people unnecessarily deny themselves nutritious and tasty food when they want to lose weight.

    Carnie, if you’re reading this, do me a favor: have some unsweetened oatmeal for breakfast, enjoy an open-faced sandwich on whole grain bread, and munch on two or three cups of air popped popcorn if your heart desires.

    Just watch your calories, get plenty of fiber, cut down on added sugars, and above all, do not fear carbohydrates.

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    Celebrity Diet Secrets: Carnie Wilson

    One of my favorite parts of flying is buying a pile of celebrity tabloids at the terminal’s newsstand before boarding the plane.

    This week’s OK! is full of nutrition-related stories. Among them? Carnie Wilson’s new weight loss struggle.

    To recap: at her heaviest, the former Wilson Phillips member weighed 300 pounds.

    In 2000, she underwent gastric bypass surgery and slimmed down to 146 pounds.

    Now, eight years later, Carnie weighs 208 pounds.

    I can’t say I’m surprised. Most people who undergo gastric bypass are not addressing the real issue at hand.

    Controlling one’s weight isn’t solely about shrinking stomach capacity.

    Emotional eating, ingrained food patterns, and nutrition education also play a huge role in determining what, why, and how much we eat.

    This is why once gastric bypass is completed, patients tend to regain weight.

    Anyhow, in this interview, Carnie “vows” to shed the excess pounds she’s accumulated over the past few years.

    A sidebox details her new diet. The headline? “I’m not eating carbs.” Sigh.

    First of all, she IS eating carbs — as she should! — as evidenced by the fact that she consumes broccoli, asparagus, oranges, apples, and carrots.

    “Carbs” are not just donuts, Wonder bread, and cookies.

    In any case, Carnie goes on to say that if she “start[s] [her] morning with a piece of toast, [she’s] doomed for the day. It’s like, give me carbs,” she explains.

    And the problem with that would be, what, exactly?

    If she were to start her day with whole — or sprouted — grain toast, accompany her lunch with a small side dish of whole wheat pasta, and then snack on a little popcorn in the afternoon, what horrible thing will befall her?

    What’s most interesting is that Carnie appears to blame her weight gain on carbs, yet she admits that what made her gain weight in the past was “go[ing] through McDonalds drive-throughs and hav[ing] a Big Mac, Super Size fries, a 20-piece Chicken McNuggets, a pie and a shake” for one meal.

    She also points to being able to “eat a bag of M&M’s in one day“.

    So, really — and clearly — the issue was excess calories, not excess carbs.

    It always frustrates me to see people unnecessarily deny themselves nutritious and tasty food when they want to lose weight.

    Carnie, if you’re reading this, do me a favor: have some unsweetened oatmeal for breakfast, enjoy an open-faced sandwich on whole grain bread, and munch on two or three cups of air popped popcorn if your heart desires.

    Just watch your calories, get plenty of fiber, cut down on added sugars, and above all, do not fear carbohydrates.

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    Celebrity Diet Secrets: You Say Bizarre, I Say Idiotic

    Dishy British newspaper The Daily Mail recounts some of Hollywood’s “bizarre diet secrets.”

    Stupid and dangerous is more like it.

    From snorting crushed Adderall to eating nothing but two boiled eggs a day (since when is calorie deprivation or practical starvation a “secret”?) to checking into hospitals for IV hydration (any doctor or nurse agreeing to this should have their license revoked immediately) to subsiding on nothing but Diet Coke and cigarettes, Hollywood’s biggest female names go to extremes to live up to insane body image standards — mostly dictated by pasty overweight men, of course.

    Luckily, celebrity trainer Gunnar Peterson serves as the article’s voice of reason, rightfully describing these “tricks” as risky, insipid, and illogical.

    Consider it a “How NOT to lose weight” reference guide.

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    Celebrity Diet Secrets: Hillary Swank

    Oy. Here we go again with ridiculous nutrition statements by celebrities. This time, it’s Hillary Swank’s turn to talk nonsense.

    In a recent interview with W Magazine, Swank proudly boasts that she takes 45 supplements a day! That’s right, in 24 hours.

    This is my Aloe C, which I dissolve in water. Here’s my flax. This one’s for my immune system, and this one is my BrainWave — it’s great, like if I have a lot of lines to memorize,” she explains to the reporter.

    All this advice comes from Dr. Oz Garcia, nutritionist to the stars, who Hillary credits with changing her life.

    Before I go on to talk about Hillary’s pill regimen, allow me to shed some light on Dr. Garcia.

    Specializing in “progressive nutrition, life extension, and anti-aging”, Dr. Garcia caters to Hollywood’s A-list and has had his number of television appearances. He also oversees nutritional services for Equinox Fitness Clubs.

    Between that bio and his splashy website, you might think this guy knows his stuff.

    Well, as we all witnessed with the Dr. Jan Adams debacle (who, despite being a media darling and even having his own show on The Discovery Health network, turned out to lack board accreditation and had a long history of malpractice claims by several patients), not everything is as it appears.

    For starters, a 1987 Time magazine article describes Dr. Garcia as a “self-taught” nutritionist. That same article states that Dr. Garcia claims he can tell someone what to eat after analyzing a strand of their hair.

    As far as I know, a strand of hair does not give you the same information as a blood test. Would Dr. Garcia advocate a high-protein diet to someone simply based on a hair sample, not knowing one of their kidneys is malfunctioning (and, therefore, need to be on a low-protein diet)?

    Dr. Garcia predictably hawks his own water, described as “99.9%” pure and containing “three times the electrolytes found in sports drinks”.

    The electrolytes in drinks like Gatorade are two minerals you all have heard of — sodium and potassium. Since Gatorade provides approximately one percent of a day’s potassium requirement, then this special water contains, at most, 3 percent of the daily requirement.

    A much smarter idea would be to get this mineral in much higher quantities from food. A cup of cantaloupes provides 10 percent, as does half a cup of Swiss chard or butternut squash. Throwing in half a cup of black beans into a salad provides 9 percent.

    Dr. Garcia also sells colon cleansing, fat-burning, and even anti-aging products, all in pill form.

    If this is the man Hillary Swank looks up to, it’s no wonder she thinks nothing of swallowing 45 pills a day.

    The excess of vitamins and minerals she is consuming is simply being excreted.

    Just for the record, let me note that there are no mentally-sharpening magic pills that help anyone with memory.

    Lastly, why is Hillary Swank taking flax in pill form? How about just sprinkling some milled flaxseed into a smoothie, salad, soup, or cereal bowl?

    The wonderfully healthy properties of flaxseed (i.e.: phytochemicals known as lignans, which have been linked to a decrease in bad cholesterol) are not replicated in a flax pill.

    And then we wonder why Kevin Trudeau’s books become bestsellers….

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    Celebrity Diet Secrets: Defeating Diabetes?

    Halle Berry firmly planted both feet in her mouth when she recently declared that she managed to “downgrade” her Type 1 diabetes into Type 2 (and go off insulin) through healthy eating and exercise.

    I know Halle made for one fierce Catwoman, but no feline prowess can be THAT miraculous!

    Type 1 diabetes, which is non-preventable, used to be known as juvenile diabetes because it is commonly diagnosed in children. There is no one “cause”, but the more solid theories point to a genetic defect.

    People with this condition are living with a non-functioning pancreas.

    Remember, the pancreas is responsible for secreting insulin (a hormone that converts glucose — a sugar present in the blood after a meal — into energy).

    Without insulin, glucose remains in the blood (rather than go into cells for energy conversion), leading to various health complications.

    People with Type 1 diabetes must inject insulin every single day.

    People with Type 2 diabetes — formerly known as “adult onset diabetes” — are living with a pancreas that DOES secrete insulin, which the cells in the body don’t recognize (hence the term “insulin resistance”).

    In turn, glucose remains in the blood, and the pancreas continues to secrete insulin.

    In the longrun, the pancreas tires itself out, and becomes unable to produce sufficient insulin on its own. The solution? Injecting insulin and/or taking pills that help stabilize blood sugar (the pills are NOT insulin).

    Here’s the good news. Type 2 diabetes can be kept under control by healthy eating, exercise, and practicing blood glucose management.

    Type 1, however, can not be reversed, no matter how healthy the person’s lifestyle, since the pancreas is completely out of order and simply can not be resuscitated.

    If Halle Berry was able to go off insulin, she was able to control her type TWO diabetes, not change from type 1 to type 2.

    Share

    Celebrity Diet Secrets: Defeating Diabetes?

    Halle Berry firmly planted both feet in her mouth when she recently declared that she managed to “downgrade” her Type 1 diabetes into Type 2 (and go off insulin) through healthy eating and exercise.

    I know Halle made for one fierce Catwoman, but no feline prowess can be THAT miraculous!

    Type 1 diabetes, which is non-preventable, used to be known as juvenile diabetes because it is commonly diagnosed in children. There is no one “cause”, but the more solid theories point to a genetic defect.

    People with this condition are living with a non-functioning pancreas. Remember, the pancreas is responsible for secreting insulin (a hormone that converts glucose — a sugar present in the blood after a meal — into energy).

    Without insulin, glucose remains in the blood (rather than go into cells for energy conversion), leading to various health complications.

    People with Type 1 diabetes must inject insulin every single day.

    People with Type 2 diabetes are living with a pancreas that DOES secrete insulin, which the cells in the body don’t recognize (hence the term “insulin resistance”).

    In turn, glucose remains in the blood, and the pancreas continues to secrete insulin. In the longrun, the pancreas tires itself out, and becomes unable to produce sufficient insulin on its own. The solution? Injecting insulin and/or taking pills that help stabilize blood sugar (the pills are NOT insulin).

    Here’s the good news. Type 2 diabetes can be kept under control by healthy eating, exercise, and practicing blood glucose management.

    Type 1, however, can not be reversed, no matter how healthy the person’s lifestyle, since the pancreas is completely out of order and simply can not be resuscitated.

    If Halle Berry was able to go off insulin, she was able to control her type TWO diabetes, not change from type 1 to type 2.

    Share
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