• baclofen dystonia http://foggiachat.altervista.o...kwd=730710 http://foggiachat.altervista.o...kwd=117495 tamoxifen package insert buy clomiphene citrate online
  • finasteride medscape paroxetine 20mg tablets clobetasol for psoriasis celecoxib drug cephalexin vs amoxicillin
    achat cialis sur internet avis avis sur cialis http://innovezdanslesimplants....page=75559 prix officiel cialis france http://innovezdanslesimplants....age=116152 viagra montreal comprimidos kamagra oral jelly kamagra bestellen http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/sismo...tta-cialis http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/sismo...l-belgique toile ici clic toile montrer

    Archive for the ‘choline’ Category

    You Ask, I Answer: Choline

    1B7796CD98BAE223AFF6643CFAF1A7What is choline?  Why is it good for us and which foods contain it?

    — @Monica_San Diego, @noelty5
    Via Twitter

    I received these tweets soon after I tweeted that 90 percent of adults in the United States do not get sufficient amounts of choline in their diets.

    Choline is an essential nutrient (‘essential’ meaning we must get it from food) that is often referred to as a “vitamin-like organic substance” that has a lot in common with the B vitamins (it is not, however, an out-and-out B vitamin).

    Choline has a number of important functions, including:

    • Proper functioning of neurotransmitters
    • Overall liver and gallbladder health
    • Fetal neural and spinal development
    • Cell permeability (allowing cells to absorb fats adequately and excrete necessary metabolites)
    • Phospholipid synthesis (necessary for cellular structure)
    • Cardiovascular health (choline helps lower homocysteine levels; high homocysteine levels are a significant risk factor for heart disease)

    As far as food sources go, these are your best bets:

    • Beef
    • Broccoli
    • Cauliflower
    • Egg yolk
    • Lentils
    • Salmon
    • Shrimp
    • Soy beans
    • Peanuts
    • Wheat germ
    • Salmon

    Men should aim for 550 milligrams a day. Women, meanwhile, need to shoot for 425.

    Multiple research studies have concluded that consistent, long-term deficiencies increase one’s risk of developing fatty liver, liver cancer, and heart disease.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Egg Yolk

    I heard somewhere that you should keep the yolk when eating eggs as you don’t absorb the protein without it.

    I know the yolk has the highest concentration of protein but I always assumed that egg whites are also a source of protein, albeit less than a whole egg.

    Can you clarify?

    — Lori (last name withheld)
    Ottawa, Ontario

    Although egg yolks contain some protein (approximately 42% of an egg’s total protein content), egg whites contain more.

    Additionally, whereas egg yolks are a mix of protein and fat, egg whites are almost entirely made up of protein.

    You do not need to eat egg yolk in order to absorb the protein in egg whites.

    That is not to say the egg yolk is useless. It’s a wonderful source of folate, vitamin A, choline, and the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Soy Lecithin

    What exactly is soy lecithin and why is it added to foods?

    Should I be concerned about it?

    — Dennise O’Grady
    Bay Head, NJ

    Lecithin is a byproduct of refined soy or sunflower oils.  Some food companies are starting to use sunflower lecithin as a way to appeal to individuals with soy allergies.  That said, soy lecithin is still the more common of the two.

    It is mainly used as an emulsifier and stabilizer in foods as well as to provide better textures to powdered beverage mixes, salad dressings, and low-fat packaged foods.

    You’ll usually see soy lecithin at the end of ingredient lists because it is used in such miniscule amounts (usually no more than 1.3 percent of the food product’s total weight.)

    The Food & Drug Administration places soy lecithin in their list of Generally Recognized as Safe foods.

    Interestingly, allergy information is not consistent. Since soy lecithins contain negligible amounts of soy protein, most people with soy allergies can consume them without experiencing any side effects.

    There have been, however, scattered reports of allergic reactions.

    Some people — particularly vegans — like to sprinkle soy lecithin granules over soups, salads, and cereals as a way to add choline to their diet.

    Makes sense to me.  A single tablespoon provides half of the daily adequate intake figure of choline (other vegan sources, like peanut butter and cauliflower, contribute anywhere from 6 to 12 percent of adequate intake value per serving).

    Share

    • Search By Topic

    • Connect to Small Bites

    • Subscribe to Small Bites

    • Archives

      • 2017 (1)
      • 2013 (1)
      • 2012 (28)
      • 2011 (90)
      • 2010 (299)
      • 2009 (581)
      • 2008 (639)
      • 2007 (355)