• paroxetine 20mg tablets http://foggiachat.altervista.o...kwd=639317 baclofen reflux medication furosemide ciprofloxacin liquid
  • http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...dapoxetine http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...e-antabuse http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...ablets-buy http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...reet-value thyroxine hormone function
    levitra générique france prix officiel cialis france ou acheter levitra en france http://innovezdanslesimplants....age=119123 faut il une ordonnance pour acheter du cialis en france viagra prix pharmacie generic viagra pas cher viagras pour homme viagra 25mg precio acheter du levitra generique trouve toile page medicament france acheter priligy generique dapoxetine ligne ici

    Archive for the ‘cream cheese’ Category

    You Ask, I Answer: Tofu Cream Cheese

    brealfastHow does tofu cream cheese stack up against regular cream cheese?

    Is the tofu type any better for you?

    — Ella Biggadike
    Brooklyn, NY

    Dairy and soy-based cream cheeses don’t offer much nutrition.

    Here is what you get in one tablespoon of dairy-based cream cheese:

    • 50 calories
    • 3 grams saturated fat (quite a bit for a mere 50-calorie serving!)
    • 1 gram protein
    • 4 percent of the vitamin A Daily Value
    • 2 percent of the phosphorus Daily Value
    • 1 percent of the Daily Value of: calcium, pantothenic acid, potassium, riboflavin, vitamin B12, vitamin K

    Of course, fat-free varieties do not offer saturated fat (and clock in at 35 calories per tablespoon).

    Soy-based cream cheeses have an almost identical nutrient profile (except their fat is mostly polyunsaturated, rather than saturated).

    The bigger nutritional concern is what cream cheese is being slathered on.

    The average bagel, for example, clocks in at anywhere from 400 – 500 calories.  Considering that it takes three or four tablespoons of cream cheese to fill them decently, you are easily looking at a 700-calorie breakfast.

    I recommend using nut butters as bagel fillings.  Their fiber, high protein content, and healthy fats (especially in the case of peanut and almond butters) will keep you full for much longer.

    A half bagel topped with two tablespoons of nut or seed butter is a filling breakfast that adds up to approximately 400 calories.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Tofu Spreads

    I haven’t been able to find any nutritional info on the tofu spreads offered at bagel stores.

    I have been using the tofu spreads as an alternative to light or fat free cream cheese, but I don’t know if I am making the best nutritional decision.

    — Jean M.
    New York, NY

    Great question! Often times, we automatically relegate something made with tofu or soy to the “healthy” category. Are we right to do so?

    Let’s consider your question by comparing two tablespoons of regular, low-fat, non-fat, and tofu cream cheese in different categories:

    CALORIES: 101 for regular, 69 for low-fat, 29 for non-fat, and 90 for tofu.

    SATURATED FAT: 6.4 grams for regular, 5.3 for low-fat, 0.4 for non-fat, and 2 for tofu.

    SODIUM: 86 milligrams for regular, 89 for low-fat, 164 for non-fat (remember, if you are completely taking out fat, you need something else for flavor’s sake!), and 115 for tofu.

    CALCIUM: Despite popular belief, cream cheese is not a good source of calcium. 23.2 milligrams for regular, 33.6 for low-fat, 55.5 for non-fat, and 60 for tofu. You should aim for 1,000 milligrams (1 gram) per day.

    As you can see, they are all pretty equal.

    Keep in mind that the average bagel contains 300 – 400 calories and approximately 650 milligrams of sodium (25% of the recommended daily limit).

    If you are looking to add some extra nutrition to it, though, I recommend a tablespoon of peanut/almond/cashew butter, which contains protein (which helps keep you full for longer, especially if your bagel is not made with whole grains and therefore lacking this nutrient), heart-healthy fats, and vitamin E in a 94 calorie package.

    Share

    • Search By Topic

    • Connect to Small Bites

    • Subscribe to Small Bites

    • Archives

      • 2017 (1)
      • 2013 (1)
      • 2012 (28)
      • 2011 (90)
      • 2010 (299)
      • 2009 (581)
      • 2008 (639)
      • 2007 (355)