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    Archive for the ‘fat-soluble vitamins’ Category

    When NOT To Go Skim

    product_sc_whiteIf you are a regular skim milk drinker and optimal nutrition is your goal, there are certain times when low-fat (1%), reduced-fat (2%), or soy (rather than skim) is the way to go.

    Although all milk in the United States is fortified with vitamins A & D, non-fat milk is a rather useless vehicle for it.  Why?  Vitamins A and D are fat-soluble, meaning they need to be consumed along with a small amount of fat (3 or 4 grams usually suffice) to be absorbed.

    If at any point in the day you are drinking non-fat milk without any other source of fat, you are much better off opting for a low-fat variety.

    Remember, an 8-ounce cup of low-fat milk only contains 14 more calories, 1.8 more grams of fat, and 0.9 more grams of saturated fat than that same amount of skim milk.

    If you enjoy the taste of soy milk, make yourself a vegan latte.  A cup of soy milk contains enough fat to help you absorb fat-soluble nutrients.

    Here are some tips to help you get the most out of your dairy consumption:

    • Accompany your fat-free morning latte with a healthy fat (i.e.: 1 tablespoon of the nut butter of your choice on whole grain toast)
    • Not a fan of sipping coffee between bites of food?  Make your coffee with low-fat, reduced fat, or soy milk
    • If you only like your oatmeal with non-fat milk, throw in some raw almonds or walnuts in there to help you absorb vitamins A and D
    • If you only enjoy fruit smoothies made with non-fat milk, add a tablespoon of ground flaxseed to add that important small amount of fat
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    You Ask, I Answer: Fat-Soluble Vitamins

    olive-oil-bottlesHow much fat do you need to eat in a meal to ensure proper absorption of vitamin A?

    — Corey Clark
    (Location withheld)

    Great question!

    There’s nothing more frustrating than eating a nutritious meal only to completely miss out on the absorption of certain vitamins and minerals.

    Remember, vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble.  They need fat to be absorbed; eating them in a completely fat-free meal (ie: salad with fat-free dressing and vinegar) is an exercise in futility.

    To ensure you are absorbing these nutrients at maximum capacity, be sure to consume them with at least 4 or 5 grams of fat.

    That should not be a hard task.  The following foods provide that amount of fat:

    • 1 teaspoon oil
    • 8 almonds
    • 1.5 ounces salmon (equivalent to a mere HALF deck of cards!)
    • A quarter of an avocado
    • Half an ounce of cheese
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    Say What?: JELL-O With Antioxidants

    Behold JELL-O’s latest creation: sugar-free, vitamin fortified gelatin snack packs.

    Relying on trendy fruit flavors (raspberry-goji berry and strawberry-acai berry), this new product contains 10% of the Recommended Dietary Allowance of two antioxidants: vitamin A and vitamin E.

    Since these two vitamins are simply tacked on (and not naturally contained in an ingredient), you might as well be eating regular JELL-O and chasing it down with a multivitamin.

    More importantly, vitamin A and vitamin E are fat-soluble, meaning they need to be consumed with some fat in order to be absorbed in the small intestine.

    Their presence in a fat-free product like Jell-O completely boggles my mind.

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