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    Archive for the ‘genetically modified food’ Category

    In The News: Franken-Corn? No, Merci

    Two thumbs up to the French.

    On March 20,”the top court upheld, at least for the time being, a ban on a corn variety produced by the American seed company Monsanto.”

    Said variety is genetically modified, leading to fears by environmentalists and farmers that “the corn, which confers resistance to pests, could pollute other crops and pose a threat to the environment and human health.

    One prominent threat is gene transfer, also known as outcrossing.

    This entails genetically modified seeds “cross-breeding” with non-genetically-modified crops as a result of something as simple as pollen spreading due to wind or animals.

    Apart from the impact this has on the stability of flora in any given environment, unfortunate financial repercussions are felt by farmers.

    There are cases of farmers in Canada being sued by — and losing to — Monsanto after the company’s patented genetically modified rapeseed seeds blew over onto their property.

    The most famous case — Monsanto Canada v. Schmeiser — is excellently summarized by Wikipedia.

    Remember, Monsanto is the same agricultural biotechnology company that produces recombivant bovine growth hormone.

    Europe is generally less tolerant of genetically modified foods than the United States. In fact, milk containing rBGH is banned in the Old Continent.

    Let’s finish off this post with some humor.

    Here is a funny — but true! — tidbit from 2000 about a Monsanto cafeteria in British Columbia proudly advertising the absence of genetically modified soy and corn in their food.

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    In The News: Frankenmilk

    Scandal is a-brewin’ in Ohio and Utah.

    Ohio has decided to go against the Food & Drug Administration policy on synthetic hormone label claims and mandate that dairy products sold in that state cannot mention being synthetic-hormone free.

    Utah, meanwhile, is looking into similar restrictions.

    Both of these policies concern rBGH — recombinant bovine growth hormone, also known as rBST, or recombinant bovine somatotropin — an artificial form of naturally-occuring bovine growth hormone.

    This synthetic compound is injected into dairy cows to significantly increase milk production.

    It’s equivalent to an alien race coming down to Earth, enslaving humans, and injecting men with an ultra powerful dose of synthetic testosterone in order for them to lift heavier weights and work harder.

    It is a purely business and money-motivated decision. The more milk you have, the more you can sell, and the more money that goes into your pocket.

    The Food & Drug Administration approved rBGH (it was declared “safe for use”) in 1993.

    Agrobusiness giant Monsanto immediately began producing and selling it by the bucketloads.

    Controversy has always surrounded rBGH, mainly because several medical trials have linked it to a higher risk of developing certain tumors and cancers.

    Monsanto and rBGH gained notoriety in the mid 90’s after a Tampa Fox affiliate pulled a story on the possible health dangers of rBGH consumption after much pressure from Monsanto.

    And it’s not just humans who can be negatively affected.

    Cows receiving rBGH injections often get sick (cows treated with rBGH have significantly higher risks of developing udder infections than those not treated with the drug).

    In turn, they are fed antibiotics — another undesirable component in milk.

    It is not surprising, then, that rBGH is banned from all dairy products in Europe and Canada.

    It frustrates me that consumers in some states are being forbidden the right to know what is in some of the foods they buy.

    I never agreed with the use of rBGH but thought that if it is included in any product, we should be made aware of its presence.

    What’s most interesting about this whole story is that the FDA is in a unique position. They permit the use of rBGH in milk, but only if there is full disclosure.

    Honesty policy or good old ass covering?

    Share

    In The News: Frankenmilk

    Scandal is a-brewin’ in Ohio and Utah.

    Ohio has decided to go against the Food & Drug Administration policy on synthetic hormone label claims and mandate that dairy products sold in that state cannot mention being synthetic-hormone free.

    Utah, meanwhile, is looking into similar restrictions.

    Both of these policies concern rBGH — recombinant bovine growth hormone, also known as rBST, or recombinant bovine somatotropin — an artificial form of naturally-occuring bovine growth hormone.

    This synthetic compound is injected into dairy cows to significantly increase milk production.

    It’s equivalent to an alien race coming down to Earth, enslaving humans, and injecting men with an ultra powerful dose of synthetic testosterone in order for them to lift heavier weights and work harder.

    It is a purely business and money-motivated decision. The more milk you have, the more you can sell, and the more money that goes into your pocket.

    The Food & Drug Administration approved rBGH (it was declared “safe for use”) in 1993.

    Agrobusiness giant Monsanto immediately began producing and selling it by the bucketloads.

    Controversy has always surrounded rBGH, mainly because several medical trials have linked it to a higher risk of developing certain tumors and cancers.

    Monsanto and rBGH gained notoriety in the mid 90’s after a Tampa Fox affiliate pulled a story on the possible health dangers of rBGH consumption after much pressure from Monsanto.

    And it’s not just humans who can be negatively affected.

    Cows receiving rBGH injections often get sick (cows treated with rBGH have significantly higher risks of developing udder infections than those not treated with the drug).

    In turn, they are fed antibiotics — another undesirable component in milk.

    It is not surprising, then, that rBGH is banned from all dairy products in Europe and Canada.

    It frustrates me that consumers in some states are being forbidden the right to know what is in some of the foods they buy.

    I never agreed with the use of rBGH but thought that if it is included in any product, we should be made aware of its presence.

    What’s most interesting about this whole story is that the FDA is in a unique position. They permit the use of rBGH in milk, but only if there is full disclosure.

    Honesty policy or good old ass covering?

    Share

    Would You Like Some Pizza On Your Fiber?

    Despite living in New York City — home of the much-talked-about Brooklyn pizza — where I am two or three blocks away from a “by the slice” mom and pop pizza place at any given moment, I am a fan of my homemade pizzas.

    I like tailoring the sauce to my own tastes, mixing in plenty of roasted garlic, oregano, pepper, and basil, and creating a wonderful aromatic blend.

    Given my interest in nutrition and love of whole grains, my pizzas are always made with ready-made Rustic Crust Old World organic Great Grains whole grain pizza crusts.

    The crispy, delicious flatbread is made entirely of whole grains and has a subtle olive flavor that adds to its appeal.

    An entire pizza crust — which can easily feed two or three — boasts an amazing 35 grams of fiber and absolutely no added sugars, trans fats, or genetically modified ingredients.

    Next time you’re in the mood for some pizza, kiss the phone goodbye and say hello to your oven.

    With a Small Bites approved organic Rustic Crust Old World Great Grains readymade pizza crust, some sauce, and cheese, you’re a mere 10 minutes away from a delicious, healthy meal.

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