• cheap orlistat que es aciclovir http://foggiachat.altervista.o...kwd=190171 ciprofloxacin kidney infection metronidazole español
  • http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...ne-implant naltrexone nausea levofloxacin en español gabapentin prices http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...0-capsules
    vente cialis original en ligne http://innovezdanslesimplants....age=373077 acheter cialis 20mg tadalafil lilly http://innovezdanslesimplants....age=176491 fiabilité cialis générique achat de viagra en pharmacie http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/sismo...rica-india kamagra se vende en farmacias cialis soft kaufen comparatif viagra levitra trova netz medicament flagyl 500 mg clic clic

    Archive for the ‘inulin’ Category

    You Ask, I Answer: Why Isn’t All Fiber Equal?

    048121276201You recently tweeted that fiber should come from foods “that inherently contain it”, rather than foods that have it added on.

    Why is that?  For example, today at the store I saw some Thomas’ 100% whole wheat English muffins that had 3 grams of fiber a piece.  But, the multigrain ones (also made by Thomas) that had white flour as the first ingredient had 8 grams of fiber each!  Aren’t the multigrain ones the better choice?

    — Tiffany Setcher
    Hoboken, NJ


    When you eat a food that intrinsically offers fiber (i.e: fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, beans, whole grains, etc.), you also get a variety of other healthful compounds — phytonutrients, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals.

    Continue Reading »

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: “Greek-Style” Yogurt

    JF08_IO5aI’m a little afraid to ask you this, but here it goes.

    I have noticed that some Greek yogurts actually say “Greek style” on their packaging (with the word “style” in tiny letters).  I’ve been reading your blog for a while, so I have a feeling this is significant.

    Are these different from (or less healthy than) a “real” Greek yogurt like Fage?

    — Melissa Heaney
    Albany, NY

    Ah, the drawbacks of being a sharp-eyed nutrition sleuth at the grocery store.

    I recall several years ago, when I first started reading ingredient lists for common brands I used to buy, walking around supermarket aisles in a heavy-hearted daze.  It was almost as if I had just been told that my significant other had been cheating on me on a daily basis.  Except that, rather than stumbling across a hurriedly-scribbled name and number on a piece of paper, I was alerted to the presence of artificial dyes, partially hydrogenated oils, and high fructose corn syrup.  Heartbreak on aisle five!

    Onto your question — there is a difference between Greek-style yogurts and actual Greek yogurts.  If you’re curious about what makes Greek yogurt special, please read this post.

    Here is the ingredient list for Fage non-fat Greek yogurt:

    Grade A Pasteurized Skimmed Milk, Live Active Yogurt Cultures (L. Bulgaricus, S. Thermophilus)

    Now, let’s take a peek at the ingredient list for a Greek-style yogurt.  For this example, I am using The Greek Gods brand:

    Pasteurized Grade A Nonfat Milk, Inulin, Pectin, Active Cultures (S. Thermophilius, L. Bulgaricus, L. Acidophilus, Bifidobacterium, L. Casei)

    Whereas “true” Greek yogurt’s thick consistency is the result of straining out the watery whey, Greek-style yogurts add thickeners (ie: gum blends like pectin and inulin, milk solids, stabilizers).

    Each yogurt’s respective Nutrition Facts label also tells the tale.  Here is what 6 ounces of real Greek yogurt offer:

    • 90 calories
    • 0 grams fiber
    • 15 grams protein
    • 19% of the Adequate Intake of calcium

    That same amount of Greek-style yogurt contains:

    • 60 calories
    • 2 grams fiber
    • 6 grams protein
    • 25% of the Adequate Intake of calcium

    Let’s make sense of that.

    • The decrease in calories is due to the reduction in protein.  Remember, Greek yogurt’s higher protein levels are due to the absence of watery whey.  Greek-style yogurt retains the whey and adds on thickeners.
    • As you know, all dairy products are fiberless.  The 2 grams of fiber in Greek-style yogurt are due to the presence of thickening gums.  Depending on what other brands of Greek-style yogurt use, the fiber value may be zero.
    • The higher percentage of calcium is also attributed to the presence of whey.

    There is nothing troubling, disturbing, or unhealthy about pectin and inulin.  We aren’t talking about blue dyes or trans fats here.  Two FYIs, though:

    1. For optimal health benefits, fiber should come from foods that naturally contain it, rather than add-ons.
    2. If you’re looking for the higher protein benefits of Greek yogurt (mainly the ability to feel satiated for a little longer), reach for the authentic product.
    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Fiber One Cereal

    fiberone_hc2.jpegI was wondering what you thought of Fiber One Honey Clusters cereal.

    The ingredient list is a little long, but the first ingredient is whole grain wheat, then whole grain oats.

    It tastes so sweet, but the label says there are only 6 grams of sugar per cup.

    Is this cereal really good for you or not?

    — Jessie Arent
    Peterborough, NH

    Let’s examine the evidence.

    First up, the nutrition label.  A 1-cup serving of Fiber One Honey Clusters contains:

    • 160 calories
    • 0 grams saturated fat
    • 280 milligrams sodium (almost twice as much as a vending-machine-size bag of potato chips)
    • 320 milligrams potassium (roughly as much as a very small banana)
    • 13 grams fiber
    • 6 grams sugar
    • 5 grams protein

    This cereal also offers — as a result of fortification — a quarter of a day’s worth of the Daily Value of all B vitamins, iron, and zinc; 10 percent of the Daily Value of calcium and phosphorus, and eight percent of the Daily Value of magnesium.

    Let’s take a peek at the ingredient list.  Some interesting observations:

    • Sugar shows up six different times, each time under a different name (sugar, brown sugar, corn syrup, barley malt extract, honey, and malt syrup).  This is a common trick used by food manufacturers.  If all of these ingredients were labeled as “sugar”, then “sugar” would show up earlier in the ingredient list.  Mind you, these six instances do not include the times sugar is part of another ingredient, as is the case with the “wheat bits.”  In total, sugar appears in some form thirteen times.
    • The high fiber content is largely due to the presence of inulin.
    • Fiber One tastes so sweet because it also contains sucralose (AKA Splenda)

    There are a few things that don’t sit well with me.

    The first is the presence of artificial sweeteners, especially since each serving of Fiber One already delivers a teaspoon and a half of sugar (which I think is a reasonable amount for a cereal to provide).

    Artificial sweeteners have the “benefit” of being calorie-free (or, in some cases, very low-calorie), but they do nothing in terms of helping our palates get used to lower amounts of sugar in the diet.  In fact, they often make it worse.  Remember, Splenda is 600 times sweeter than sugar!

    While there is nothing wrong with including inulin (a prebiotic fiber naturally found in asparagus, onions, bananas, and other fruits and vegetables), I am not a huge fan of extracting it simply to boost fiber values.

    That said, it is at least being used in a whole grain product.  I have a real problem when refined grain products use inulin to give themselves a fiber boost.

    What I always tell people who consume Fiber One products is to treat it as one of many sources of fiber.  In other words, Fiber One should not be the only source of fiber in your diet.

    I specifically say that because I have come across a fair share of consumers who have told me one reason why they love Fiber One is because, if they have two cups of it a day, then they don’t really have to worry about eating fiber the rest of the day.

    Not true.  Other foods — fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and other whole grains — contain different kinds of fibers (and hundreds of different phytonutrients!) that deliver their unique share of health benefits.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Isolated Fibers

    I ran across a juice from Bolthouse Farms and was shocked when I saw that it packs in EIGHT grams of soluble fiber in one 8 fl oz serving!

    My eyes went to the ingredient list right away to see just what, if anything, was added to get that impressive number.

    What I found was dextrin, inulin, and xanthan gum all added and listed as “dietary fiber”.

    Are these treated by the body in the same manner as more “raw” food would be when it comes to the benefits the soluble fiber can provide?

    Are they mainly tossed in to get that impressive number and in reality not as effective for the body as soluble fiber from fruits or some other “raw” source?

    Other than that, what are you general thoughts on some Bolthouse Farms drinks?

    I still try to grab something that doesn’t have a bunch of sugar in it when I just feel like something refreshing to drink while watching a movie or something but as juice goes, does Bolthouse seem slightly above the others?

    — Andrew Carney
    Richland, WA

    You have to love those isolated fibers — food manufacturers certainly do!

    After all, how else would you manage to get eight grams of soluble fiber in 8 ounces of a drink that is nothing more than a medley of fiber-free, sugar-loaded juice concentrates?

    Although dextrin, inulin, and xanthan gum are real fibers that exist in nature, I am not a fan of consuming nutrients in isolated form.

    Food science research has demonstrated on several occassions that, for optimal performance, nutrients need to play off each other (and other phytochemicals in food.)

    This is precisely one reason why clinical trials involving vitamin E supplementation show different results than those in which vitamin E is consumed in the diet from food sources.

    Similarly, while oatmeal offers LDL-cholesterol lowering properties thanks to soluble fiber (in particular beta-glucan, which is not in this Bolthouse drink), it also offers manganese, selenium, and magnesium at the tune of 145 calories per cup.

    The drink you are asking about, meanwhile, packs in 350 calories’ worth of concentrated juices and then throws in fiber, vitamins, and minerals to provide a healthier image.

    The fact that one bottle contains 15 grams of soluble fiber is also worrying, as this can result in some very painful bloating for those unaccustomed to taking in such large amounts in one sitting.

    My verdict? You might as well be drinking Kool Aid, stirring in some Metamucil, and popping a Centrum.

    That being said, if you enjoy the drink and can afford the calories, enjoy it… as a sweet treat.

    On that note, one word of caution. When it comes to juice drinks, don’t hunt around for fiber, Omega-3’s, or added buzz-worthy nutrients.

    How come? I find that it is usually the drinks highest in calories and sugars that tack on these nutrients in order to trick consumers into thinking they are doing their health a favor.

    The best thing to look for when it comes to these beverages is a small bottle.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Western Alternative Bagel

    [What do you think of] the Western Alternative Bagel?

    — Anonymous (via the blog)

    To those of you who have never heard of it, the Western alternative bagel is developed by California-based chain Western Bagel.

    Each two-ounce bagel clocks in at 110 calories and contais 0 grams of fat, 0 grams of sugar, 7 grams of fiber, and 6 grams of protein.

    Here’s the mystery, though. Look at the ingredient list: Enriched unbleached flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, reduced iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), water, wheat gluten, corn starch, inulin, oat fiber. May contain 2% or less of: calcium sulfate, enzymes, l-cysteine, salt, yeast, calcium propionate and sorbic acid (preservatives), artificial flavor, sucralose.

    Whole wheat flour is nowhere to be found.

    Sure, oat fiber is present, but towards the end. Certainly not in a sufficient quantity to result in seven grams of fiber.

    So…how do they do it?

    Allow me to introduce you to inulin.

    Also known as chicory root, it is a natural fiber (and prebiotic!) found in asparagus, onions, bananas, and other fruits and vegetables.

    Some of you may have heard the term ‘prebiotic’ before but are not sure what it means.

    In essence, when we consume inulin, the bacteria in our digestive system digests it and forms fructooligosaccharides, which in turn increase the number of beneficial bacteria in our colon.

    The higher our beneficial bacteria count, the healthier our intestinal tract.

    Food manufacturers love inulin, since it can replaces fat, whole wheat flour, and sugar while still giving baked goods a soft texture and and pleasant mouthfeel.

    From a health standpoint, it contains the same benefits as other fibers — longer-lasting satiety, regularity, and increased stool bulk.

    Additionally, it does not raise blood-glucose levels, so it is deemed safe for diabetics.

    In The Netherlands, inulin has been given an official stamp of approval. Products containing this fiber can legally be advertised as “promoting well-balanced intestinal [intestinal] flora composition.”

    It gets better! A 2006 Brazilian study published in renowned journal Nutrition Research found that inulin helps increase calcium and magnesium absorption.

    Any drawbacks? Two I can think of.

    First, consuming large amounts of inulin (especially if you are not accustomed to it) can result in flatulence and mild stomach pains.

    Additionally, although inulin has its nutritional advantages, it is missing most of the goodness found in whole grains.

    A bagel made with refined grains and inulin is definitely a better option than a fiberless one made solely with white flour.

    However, whole grains are more than just fiber. They are an exclusive mix of phytonutrients, plant sterols, and antioxidants with their own health-boosting properties.

    I don’t think of inulin (while helpful and beneficial in its own right) as a true substitute for a 100% whole grain product.

    Share

    • Search By Topic

    • Connect to Small Bites

    • Subscribe to Small Bites

    • Archives

      • 2017 (1)
      • 2013 (1)
      • 2012 (28)
      • 2011 (90)
      • 2010 (299)
      • 2009 (581)
      • 2008 (639)
      • 2007 (355)