• gabapentin tolerance propranolol 10 mg albuterol blood pressure metronidazole 1 http://foggiachat.altervista.o...kwd=103868
  • revia online purchase thyroxine levels propranolol over the counter fluconazole reviews http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...ramate-moa
    peut on acheter du cialis sans ordonnance en france acheter tadalafil sans ordonnance cialis 5 mg generique cialis prix paris peut on acheter du cialis sans ordonnance compra genericos cialis viagra köpa cialis i sverige ou acheter du viagra sur paris viagra senza ricetta in italia similares tadalafil mostrare aqui page partire médicament priligy

    Archive for the ‘Lara bars’ Category

    You Ask, I Answer: Pro Bars

    pro-100087How do you feel about ProBars?

    @CatherineAnne
    Via Twitter

    Advertised as “whole food meals”, these bars certainly are not cheap, retailing for $3.49 a pop!

    In comparison, Lara Bars go for approximately $1.39, and Clif Nectar bars average $2.19 a piece.

    Are ProBars worth it?  Let’s analyze.

    Though available in twelve varieties, Superfood Slam is one of the more popular flavors.  Here is the official product description:

    Superfood Slam s a nutritional powerhouse. Our organic acai berries, pure raspberries, dark chocolate and live greens are blended together with PROBAR’s 15 signature whole food ingredients for a bar that is good for you and tastes SUPER.

    This bar also boasts Health Magazine’s “American’s healthiest food” seal of approval, which truly boggles my mind.

    My main issue is that the third ingredient in this bar is brown rice syrup — AKA, added sugar.

    Halfway down the list, evaporated cane juice (a fancier term for sugar) pops up.

    The cherry pretzel bar, meanwhile, lists brown rice syrup as the first ingredient!  I find it rather ironic that a bar that sells itself on being a “whole food meal” has what is essentially sugar as the most prominent ingredient.  The 420 milligrams of sodium also don’t do it many favors.

    The kettle corn flavor also lists brown rice syrup as the first ingredient.  Added sugars pop up two more times (once as barley malt syrup, and then as evaporated cane juice).

    Remember, one reason food companies love these sugar alternatives is because they can be listed separately and, therefore, give the illusion that there isn’t as much sugar in a food product.

    If all caloric sweeteners were listed as “sugar” in the ingredient list, a lot of products would have that as their first ingredient.

    While I wouldn’t go as far as calling ProBars junk food (they are not), I think they are overrated.  I also don’t like the notion of cramming so many foods into one bar, as it doesn’t allow for substantial quantities of each one to be used.

    In my book, Lara Bars and Clif Nectar Bars are true whole-food bars.  Their short ingredient lists are solely made up of fruits, nuts, and seeds, and lack added sweeteners.  If anything, THEY deserve that seal of approval from Health magazine!

    Share

    Three Easy Ways To Reduce Your Intake of Added Sugars

    sugarFollowing last week’s post on the amount of added sugar in a large McDonald’s vanilla latte, I received several e-mails asking for tips on gradually reducing sugar consumption.

    Here are my three favorite strategies.  They are realistic, practical, and will have you consuming a lot less added sugar (and calories!) in a few weeks.

    1. At Starbucks: Call The Shots

    Although it’s common knowledge — and prominent in pop culture humor — that Starbucks lets you customize your drink to the last detail, many people forget this applies to the amount of sugar you get.

    Any time you ask for a beverage with flavored syrup in it (i.e.: hazelnut latte or caramel machiatto), these are the sugar and calorie amounts you are getting:

    • Tall: 1 pump of syrup (4 grams/1 teaspoon of sugar, 16 extra calories)
    • Grande: 3 pumps of syrup (12 grams/3 teaspoons of sugar, 48 extra calories)
    • Venti: 5 pumps of syrup (20 grams/5 teaspoons of sugar, 80 extra calories)

    Next time you order a Grande or Venti flavored drink, specify “with 1 pump of syrup.”  You’ll save yourself anywhere from 8 to 16 grams (two to four teaspoons!) of added sugar.

    2. Befriend seltzer

    A daily soda habit can be a difficult thing to change, particularly if the goal goes beyond simply replacing full-calorie soda with diet soda.

    My favorite tip here is to slowly wean yourself off regular soda with the help of seltzer.

    Say your soda habit consists of a 20-ounce bottle of Sierra Mist with dinner every night.

    Rather than make your goal 20 ounces of Diet Sierra Mist’s artificial chemicals a day, gradually adjust your tastebuds to flavored seltzer (which has no added sugars or sweeteners).

    Even though artificial sweeteners are calorie-free (or very low in calories), they register as “several times sweeter than sugar” with our tastebuds.  The last thing you want to do is make the tastebuds become accustomed to that degree of sweetness!

    Start by drinking a 75% soda/25% lemon-lime seltzer combination for one full week.  The next week, try a 50/50 ratio.  The week after that, create a 25/75 ratio.

    By the time you fully replace soda with seltzer, you will have effortlessly gotten rid of 188 calories (and 12.5 teaspoons of added sugar) from your diet.

    3. Get Your Energy From Whole Foods, Not Candy Energy Bars

    The vast majority of “energy bars” and “protein bars” are nothing more than vitamin-and-mineral-fortified chocolate bars with a sprinkle of extra protein.

    The average Luna bar has almost three teaspoons of added sugar, while a typical Clif Bar contains anywhere from five to six teaspoons (as much as 10 Hershey’s kisses).

    High-protein bars, meanwhile, can pack in as much added sugar as a 12-ounce can of soda.

    I am not suggesting you should never eat these bars, but they truly belong in the “treat” category (rather than under “healthy snacks”).

    As an alternative, pack one of the following snacks in your gym bag, briefcase, bookbag, or purse:

    • Handful of nuts of your choice
    • Lara or Clif Nectar bars (since the sugar in these bars is exclusively naturally-occurring from fruits, it is not a source of empty calories)
    • Mini nut butter sandwiches (try almond or cashew butter if you’re bored with peanut butter) made with 100% whole grain crackers
    • Low-sugar (no more than 6 grams of sugar per serving) 100% whole grain cereal
    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Sugar/Fruit

    You often say that “sugar is sugar” when talking about calories from white sugar, brown sugar, or evaporated cane juice.

    But then you point out that a Lara bar is a healthy snack choice because it has no added sugar.

    They are made with dates, though, which have sugar.

    So if “sugar is sugar,” why don’t you say that a Lara bar is essentially the same thing as a Snickers?

    — Raymond (last name withheld)
    Brooklyn, NY

    The three sweeteners you mention in your first sentence are commonly referred to as “empty calories.”

    This means they contribute nothing but calories to our diets. There are no “redeeming qualities” to them. Not only do they not offer a single vitamin or mineral, they also don’t do anything in the way of satiety.

    That is precisely why 600-calories of soda don’t fill you up anywhere near as much as 600 calories of a meal containing some fat, protein, and fiber.

    (Slight tangent: a semi-exception can be made for pure maple syrup in the ‘mineral’ category, since a single tablespoon provides a third of the daily value of manganese.)

    In any case, snack bars made with dates — such as Lara — are different from bars that tack on extra calories via a sweetener.

    The dates in these bars contribute naturally-occurring sugars which co-exist with potassium, fiber, and many phytochemicals and antioxidants in that fruit.

    While brown sugar and white sugar are identical from a nutritional standpoint, those two sugars are nutritionally inferior to fresh or dry fruit.

    Hence, a Lara bar and a Snickers bar are worlds apart.

    The Snickers bar gets a large portion of its calories from sugar and certainly does not provide the same amount of potassium, fiber, or phytochemicals as its date-based counterpart.

    This is why I would love food labels to differentiate between naturally occurring versus added sugars.

    A Lara bar might seem to have almost as much sugar as a Snickers bar, but we are talking about two very different sources of sweetness.

    Share

    Price Check

    Recent newspaper articles have referred to Whole Foods beginning to earn a bit of a bad reputation as an elitist supermarket, thereby earning the monicker “Whole Paycheck.”

    Hogwash! I wholeheartedly challenge that simplistic label — and I come prepared with proof.

    Yesterday afternoon I stopped by a local (New York City) Whole Foods to purchase a few dinner ingredients.

    Upon scanning my receipt, I was actually surprised at the good deals I got — on items that weren’t even on sale!

    Let’s start with a 16 oz (1 lb.) bag of Whole Foods’ 365 brand whole wheat fusilli.

    Name brands sell their 16 oz. boxes for anywhere from $2.49 to $3.99, even at conventional supermarkets.

    This particular product? $1.49! Certainly one of the most affordable prices for whole wheat fusilli I have come across in MONTHS.

    Lara bars, meanwhile, are a delicious staple of mine that can be rather costly if you buy them at the wrong store.

    I have been charged as much as $2.49 for one of these bars in the past (upon learning of that price, my thoughts screamed out “Hell to the no!” and I promptly returned the bar to its display case) .

    Whole Foods sells each one for $1.29.

    That’s actually forty cents cheaper than what Lara herself charges on her website (where a 16-bar box retails for $27.00, thereby making each bar worth $1.67)!

    One of my other favorite snack bars is Gnu Food’s Flavor & Fiber bars, which the manufacturer — and most other stores — sells for $1.99.

    Well, today at Whole Foods I bought several 5-count at $6.99 per box.

    Some simple division reveals that, thereby, each individual bar cost me $1.40.

    I also bought fresh broccoli that was available for $1.99/pound.

    Conventional supermarkets in New York City are selling that same amount of the flowery vegetable for $2.99.

    If anything, my trip to Whole Foods proved to be a money saver.

    Of course, there are some items at Whole Foods — mainly cuts of meat — that are certainly pricier than at other grocery stores, but this notion that they do not provide any affordable choices is ludicrous.

    For more “nutriconomic” information, I highly recommend you take a look at this link, which shows how prices have changed for a variety of common foods — and fuel! — between July 2007 and July 2008 (NOTE: The left-hand column displays U.S. city averages, while the right-hand column particularly focuses on the Midwest region of the country.)

    Some of the standouts:

    White flour increased 54.1%
    Long-grain white rice increased 45.3%
    Eggs have shot up 33.9%
    Sweet peppers rose 34.6%

    If these increases don’t make sense to you, scroll down to the very bottom and look at what has happened to fuel costs in the past 12 months.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Fiber

    I eat fresh veggies and hardly any processed food, whole wheat bread, fruit, salad, etc.

    Since logging my food intake daily on the Daily Plate.com, I see I am significantly under my daily requirements for fiber.

    How can I increase fiber without adding a lot of extra calories? I already know about eating brown rice, whole grains, etc. I also eat steel cut oatmeal often as well too.

    — Laura Lafata
    Miami Beach, FL

    Since fiber is free of calories, replacing low-fiber carbohydrates with ones higher in fiber will not increase your caloric intake up.

    I am not sure what your totals are, but I will say that if your diet is low in calories, you will find it difficult to reach your fiber goals.

    However, here are some tips on increasing your daily fiber intake.

    If you are a cereal person, grab one that provides 4 or 5 grams of fiber per serving.

    When it comes to bread (whether it’s for toast or a sandwich), always go for whole grain varieties offering at least 3 grams of fiber per slice.

    For quick on-the-go snacks, try out Lara, Clif Nectar, Pure, or Gnu bars (Gnu bars offer 12 grams of fiber; this may be too much at once for some people, so you can try having half a bar with breakfast and the other half after lunch.)

    Beans and legumes are great sources of fiber. If you’re having soup, opt for black bean or lentil rather than minestrone, tomato, or chicken noodle.

    Similarly, add half a cup of chickpeas or kidney beans to salads and wraps.

    For an extra fiber boost throughout the day, sprinkle ground flaxseed on soups, salads, yogurt, smoothies, and cereal.

    Two tablespoons provide 4 grams of fiber and more than a day’s worth of Omega -3 Alpha Linolenic Fatty Acids in a 70-calorie package.

    Due to the presence of these polyunsaturated fats, be sure to keep ground flaxseed meal in the refrigerator to slow down rancidity.

    Share

    Perfect Pickings: Nut Mixes/Trail Mix

    Let me begin by saying that all nut products will contain (heart-healthy) fats — there is no use in looking for low-fat trail mix!

    Contrary to popular belief, raw and roasted nuts are virtually identical.

    An ounce of raw almonds contains 164 calories, a mere five less than the same amount ounce of a roasted variety.

    What differs most between the two is sodium content.

    Whereas an ounce of raw almonds contributes 0 milligrams of sodium, that same amount of roasted almonds contains 100 milligrams.

    You won’t find too many nutritional differences among commercial trail mixes.

    The overwhelming majority pack in the following per quarter-cup serving:

    • 130 – 150 calories
    • 75 – 100 milligrams of sodium
    • 2 grams of fiber
    • 5 – 8 grams of protein

    However, this is one product where a peek at the ingredients list comes in handy.

    All trail mixes containing dried fruit, for example, will show high sugar values on their nutritional labels.  This is where you need to read the ingredient list closely.  Look for plain and simple dried fruit.

    Hence, seeing “raisins, dried mangoes” (literally dried fruit) is much better than “dried cranberries [sucrose]” (fruit with added sugar).

    Since berries are generally tart when dried, expect trail mixes containing them them to contain added sugar for flavor-enhancing purposes.

    While M&M’s and caramel corn are tasty additions, they make for trail mixes with inferior nutrition profiles.

    If it’s nutrition you seek, stick to the tried and true classics.

    Speaking of dried fruit, though, there is one component in trail mix that is especially worth looking out for.

    The sneaky culprit I am referring to? None other than dried bananas!

    Their nutrient profile is inferior to that of a common banana (potassium, vitamin C, and fiber are significantly lower), and since they are deep fried prior to being dried, their calorie and fat content is significantly heightened.

    Keep in mind that all trail mix is calorically dense (a quarter cup clocks in at roughly 150 calories); it was originally a snack consumed by people who hiked for hours and needed a quick and healthy energy boost.

    That said, if you’re seeking a nutritious trail mix, Bear Naked’s Pacific Crest Mix is one I have enjoyed a few times — it’s low in sodium and contains no added sugar.

    Sometimes, I prefer to make my own trail mixes.

    I usually throw in a whole grain (usually oat-based) cereal low in added sugar, sunflower seeds, almonds, cashews, raisins, and half a handful of cacao nibs (you could also break up a square of dark chocolate — comprised of at least 75% cocoa, if you’re looking to get some health benefits — into small bits and mix it in!)

    If you enjoy the combination of fruits and nuts and want it in an even more nutritious package, I suggest trying Lara, Clif Nectar, or Pure bars.

    If they are hard to find in your area, click on each bar’s name to be directed to their respective order pages.

    Share

    Perfect Pickings: Nut Mixes/Trail Mix

    Let me begin by saying that all nut products will contain (heart-healthy) fats — there is no use in looking for low-fat trail mix!

    Expect 10 – 12 grams per quarter cup serving.

    Contrary to popular belief, raw and roasted nuts are virtually identical.

    An ounce of raw almonds contains 164 calories, a mere five less than an ounce of a roasted variety.

    What differs between the two is sodium content.

    Whereas an ounce of raw almonds contributes 0 milligrams of sodium, that same amount of roasted almonds contains 100 milligrams.

    You won’t find too many nutritional differences among commercial trail mixes.

    The overwhelming majority packs in 130 – 150 calories, 75 – 100 milligrams of sodium, 2 grams of fiber, and 5 – 8 grams of protein per serving.

    However, this is one product where a peek at the ingredients list comes in handy.

    All trail mixes containing dried fruit, for example, will initially appear high in sugar, partly because food labels do not differentiate between naturally-occurring and added sugars.

    This is where you need to read the label. Look for plain and simple dried fruit.

    Hence, seeing “raisins, dried mangoes” (literally dried fruit) is much better than “dried cranberries [sucrose]” (fruit with added sugar).

    Since berries are generally tart when dried, expect them to have sugar added on to enhance flavor.

    While M&M’s and caramel corn are tasty additions, they taint the nutrition profile of mixes consisting exclusively of nuts, seeds, and dried fruits.

    If it’s nutrition you are seeking — stick to the tried and true classics.

    Speaking of dried fruit, though, there is one component in trail mix that is especially worth looking out for.

    Just one ounce provides 40 percent of a day’s worth of saturated fat and 145 calories.

    The sneaky culprit I am referring to? None other than dried bananas!

    Their nutrient profile is inferior to that of a common banana (potassium, vitamin C, and fiber are significantly lower), and since they are deep fried in quite a bit of coconut oil prior to being dried, saturated fat content is off the charts!

    Keep in mind that all trail mix is calorically dense (a quarter cup clocks in at roughly 150 calories); it was originally a snack consumed by people hiking for hours, in need of a quick and healthy energy boost.

    That being said, if you’re seeking a nutritious trail mix, Bear Naked’s Pacific Crest Mix is one I have enjoyed a few times — it’s low in sodium and contains no added sugar.

    Sometimes, I like to make my own trail mixes.

    I usually throw in a whole grain (usually oat-based) cereal low in added sugar, sunflower seeds, almonds, cashews, raisins, and half a handful of cacao nibs (you could also break up a square of dark chocolate — comprised of at least 75% cocoa, if you’re loking to get some health benefits — into small bits and mix it in!)

    Although a good source of protein and vitamin E, you would need to eat a significant amount of trail mix (and calories!) to make it a high-fiber snack.

    If you enjoy the combination of fruits and nuts and want it in an even more nutritious package, I suggest trying Lara, Clif Nectar, or Pure bars.

    If they are hard to find in your area, click on each bar’s name to be directed to their respective order pages.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Fiber

    I’ve recently been drinking Naked Juice because I love the taste of it.

    I know full well (from my last question) that it isn’t a replacement for healthy eating, so I still try to round out my diet.

    However, fiber seems like something I still probably am not getting enough of, and I would love to add, like, 10 grams a day mixed into my juice.

    Do you know if any of those pure “green” juices include fiber?

    If not, do you know of any powdered fiber supplement that isn’t marketed as a laxative?

    I know it shouldn’t stop me, but as a healthy 21 year-old, I can’t bring myself to go buy Metamucil.

    Until I can afford to drop $500 on a crazy blender that blends whole fruits, I’m hoping adding some powdered fiber to a juice will help.

    — Andrew Carney
    Richland, WA

    If your goal is to increase fiber consumption, skip the powders and liquids and go for a much tastier and plentiful source — food.

    I personally don’t understand the decision behind taking Metamucil as a fiber supplement.

    It has an unpleasant taste and texture, doesn’t offer more fiber than food (one serving offers 3 grams — as much as six Triscuit crackers,) and doesn’t provide the naturally-occurring nutrients and phytochemicals in fiber-rich foods.

    So, if 10 grams is what you seek, enjoy your juices as they are and consider the following instead:

    Snack on one Gnu Flavor & Fiber, Lara, Pure, or Clif Nectar bar every day.

    Add a half cup of legumes (chickepas, kidney beans, lentils) to a meal. Some easy options? Heat up some lentil soup or add legumes to a salad, wrap, or burrito.

    Complement your breakfast with a cup of whole grain cereal or two slices of whole (or sprouted) grain toast. For an extra fiber boost, start off your morning with fruit as well (a medium banana provides 3 grams of fiber).

    If you’re making smoothies at home, add two tablespoons of ground flaxseed. You’ll get Omega-3 fatty acids, lignans, and 4 grams of fiber in a 70 calorie package.  Another great option?  One tablespoon of psyllium husks is a wonderful way to add soluble fiber to your day.

    Like pasta? Next time you make some, mix a regular variety with a whole wheat one.
    A cup of cooked whole wheat pasta packs in 5 grams.

    By all means, try to get your fiber from food first.

    There’s no reason why anyone — young or old — should be spending money on fiber supplements.

    Share

    You "Ask", I Answer: You Bar

    I was wondering if you’ve heard of You Bar, which is a company that lets you customize your own bar and only uses natural ingredients.

    It sounds like a really cool idea.

    — Vincci Tsui
    Via the blog

    Thanks for bringing this to my attention, Vincci!

    I had never heard of You Bar until I read your message. Sounds right up my alley, too.

    You can basically make your own Lara/Clif Nectar/Pure bar by combining a variety of (mostly nutritious) ingredients to your liking (from dates to optional whey protein powders to dried fruits to a variety of nuts and seeds which you can specifically ask to be roasted, raw, or organic!)

    Sounds like a deliciously unique gift idea for a foodie or nutritious snacker in your family or group of friends.

    Share

    Numbers Game: Answer

    A standard large popcorn and large soda combo at the nation’s largest multiplex theaters provides 1,900 calories, 275 percent of the daily saturated fat limit, and 13 tablespoons of added sugar.

    Yikes! That’s a day’s worth of calories for the average adult.

    The popcorn alone is calorically equivalent to THREE Big Mac’s.

    What’s truly a shame is that movie popcorn tends to give the whole grain an unfairly bad reputation.

    When air popped and sprinkled with a little salt, popcorn is a healthy, low-calorie snack.

    Why, then, is the stuff in the oversized buckets such a nutrition disaster? It’s all about the oil it is popped in.

    The large majority of movie theaters use coconut oil, which is chock-full of unhealthy saturated fat.

    This is the fat that raises total and LDL (unhealthy) cholesterol.

    The practice of then drenching this popcorn in liquid butter also does not help.

    Theater managers be damned, I like to bring my own healthy snacks to movies (yes, I throw out all my wrappers on my way out).

    Some good ones? A small bag of trail mix, a food bar (i.e.: Lara, Clif Nectar, gnu, Pure), an apple, whole grain crackers, and your best weapon against mindless snacking — gum!

    Share

    Numbers Game: Answer

    According to figures by Consumer Insight, the average Thanksgiving dinner (three ounces of turkey with gravy + one serving of mashed potatoes + one serving of cranberry sauce + one serving of candied yams + one serving of green bean casserole + a slice of pumpkin pie + two bread rolls with butter) adds up to 2,777 calories and 90 grams of fat.

    Yes, just one meal provides approximately a day and a half’s worth of calories and fat for most people.

    It isn’t too far-fetched, then, to say that on Thanksgiving Day, many people can take in almost 4,000 calories.

    One huge mistake I see many people make on holidays like Thanksgiving is starving all day (or follow non-sensical rules like “I will eat nothing but celery sticks until dinner”) in anticipation of a huge meal where high-calorie foods are at their disposal.

    End result? Gorging and bingeing all through dinner (and taking in more calories in one sitting than they would have had they eaten sensibly throughout the day) followed by some unrealistic diet goal announcement like, “that’s it. Tomorrow it’s nothing but chicken broth and grapes.”

    The best thing you can do before sitting down to a meal where overindulgence seems imminent is to prepare yourself.

    Approximately forty five minutes to an hour before dinner, snack on foods containing fiber, healthy fats, and protein.

    Some good pre-Thanksgiving dinner snacks include a handful of nuts, a Lara/Clif Nectar/Pure bar, whole grain crackers with hummus, and a bowl of whole grain cereal with raisins or a banana.

    If you can make it to the dinner table without starving and wanting seconds of everything, you can enjoy your meal without overloading on calories.

    Besides, you know as well as I do that slices of those tempting pies — along with every other dish — will be in the fridge tomorrow (and the day after, and the week after that). There is no need to shove it down if, by the end of dinner, you already feel like a Macy’s parade balloon.

    Also, find ways to make classic dishes healthier.

    Serve whole wheat rolls with trans-fat-free margarine, opt for oven-roasted potatoes and sweet potatoes drizzled with olive oil and topped with chopped rosemary in place of mashed potatoes, and check out this delicious low-fat pumpkin recipe made with a whole grain crust!

    Share

    Raising the Bar

    As followers of my blog and newsletters know, I am partial to Lara and Clif Nectar bars (based on true preference, not advertising dollars or a free lifetime supply in exchange for good PR).

    Apart from their rich deliciousness, I love that they are made from anywhere from two to five ingredients (all of which are real food — no extracts, dehydrated by-products, or artificial flavors) and offer great taste in a powerful nutrition package.

    Whatever vitamins and minerals they offer are naturally found in the ingredients, not synthesized in a lab and thrown on in an attempt to turn a candy bar with soy crisps into a “healthy” product.

    I am happy to announce I found another food bar to add to my (and your!) list of favorites — the Pure Bar.

    That’s right: a food — not energy — bar. After all, energy is provided by calories, so, in essence, a Three Musketeers bar could be called an “energy bar”. I suppose the Mars company could even refer to M&M’s as “energy pellets” if they were truly desperate.

    Pure Bars are available in a variety of standout flavors, including trail mix, chocolate brownie, and apple cinnamon.

    All varieties are certified organic, kosher, and vegan, and provide 200 calories, 400 mg of Omega-3 fatty acids (that’s 20 percent of the daily requirement!), 5 grams of fiber, 250 milligrams of potassium, 1 gram of saturated fat, and 100% naturally occurring sugars.

    As far as the ingredients: organic dates, organic walnuts, organic agave nectar, organic almonds, organic cashes, organic brown rice protein and, in the case of the chocolate brownie flavor, organic cocoa.

    The fruit content is so high that one bar alone provides 1.5 servings of fruit!

    Isn’t that wonderfully simple?

    For more information, please visit the Pure Bar website.

    Share

    Numbers Game: Answer

    An investigation by Efit.com revealed that the average airplane meal provides 1,200 calories, 50 grams of fat, and 2,000 milligrams of sodium.

    That’s 87 percent of the maximum sodium recommendation in just one (rather bland) meal.

    How can you fix this? Here are my suggestions.

    Two days before your flight, check out your airline’s website to see what special meals they offer. Many airlines allow you to choose from a variety, ranging from vegetarian to low fat to high fiber! As an added bonus, special meals are usually delivered to fliers before that dreaded cart starts hitting the knees and elbows of everyone with an aisle seat.

    Also, take healthy snacks on board with you. Bring some raw nuts, whole wheat crackers, and healthy bars like Lara or Clif Nectar.

    Share

    • Search By Topic

    • Connect to Small Bites

    • Subscribe to Small Bites

    • Archives

      • 2017 (1)
      • 2013 (1)
      • 2012 (28)
      • 2011 (90)
      • 2010 (299)
      • 2009 (581)
      • 2008 (639)
      • 2007 (355)