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    Archive for the ‘Mountain Dew’ Category

    Bromine: Mountain Dew’s Dirty Little Secret

    One of my tweets yesterday regarded the arrival of the latest Dunkin’ Donuts beverage — the Mountain Dew Coolatta.

    It’s certainly a tweet-worthy item.  A small (16 oz.) one contains almost 13 teaspoons of added sugar, while a large (32 oz.) contributes no less than 25 teaspoons of sugar.

    The 25-ingredient list also caught my eye.  Check it out:

    Frozen Neutral Base [Water, Neutral Base (Sugar, Glucose, Fructose, Silicon Dioxide, Malic Acid, Xanthan Gum)], Mountain Dew Coolatta Concentrate [Treated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Citric Acid, Orange Juice Concentrate, Sodium Hexametaphosphate (to protect flavor), Xanthan Gum, Ethyl Alcohol, Natural and Artificial Flavor, Caffeine, Sodium Benzoate (preserves freshness), Gum Arabic, Sodium Citrate, Glycerol Ester of Rosin, Calcium Disodium EDTA (to protect flavor), Erythorbic Acid (preserves freshness), Yellow 5, Brominated Vegetable Oil].

    It is that last ingredient — brominated vegetable oil — that most people aren’t aware of.  And, in this case, what you don’t know may indeed hurt you.
    Continue Reading »

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    In The News: Opening Up A Can Of… Worms

    Did any of you watch 20/20’s investigative report on the children of Appalachia two weeks ago?

    If not, you can watch it here. Truly eye-opening — and heartbreaking.

    I finally caught up with it last night (thank you, DVR!).

    One segment focused on the dental health of children and adolescents in that area; more specifically, the problem of “Mountain Dew mouth.”

    As a result of extreme soda consumption (Mountain Dew is given to children in sippy cups and considered an ailment for depression), children as young as two years of age are developing cavities.

    Some elementary school students have such damaged teeth that the simple act of brushing is painful — so painful, in fact, that many of these children stop brushing their teeth.

    In an attempt to help, dentist Edwin Smith spent $150,000 of his savings to turn an 18 wheel truck into a mobile dental clinic.

    This segment has set off a firestorm among the nutrition community. All sorts of questions are being asked — and hotly debated.

    Is it accurate to blame soda — and a specific brand at that — for cavities?

    Or does the lack of dental hygiene awareness and access to dental care set the stage for problems regardless of the types of food eaten?

    After all, starchy foods like bread, rice, and crackers are just as likely to increase cavity risk.  Also, a case can certainly be made that many people drink soda and don’t get cavities because they take adequare care of their oral health.

    What is most interesting is Pepsi’s response to this. Make that responses — three of them!

    Here is the first one.

    Notice the drastic change in tone in their second statement.

    And, finally, here is the short third statement that followed.

    As if that wasn’t enough, Diane Sawyer gave further updates on Good Morning America last week. The big announcement? PepsiCo. decided to pay for a second mobile clinic.

    What role — if any — should Pepsi play in this? Is their donation of a second mobile clinic a form of aid or just a publicity stunt for good PR?

    What about local and federal government? Should they be involved?

    Then we get to the hottest button issue of all. How does this problem begin to get addressed? Education? Policy? Some sort of hybrid?

    I’m even more disturbed by the fact that, as a result of mountaintop mining for coal, tap water in much of the Appalachian region is contaminated and undrinkable.

    Please weigh in with any opinion(s) you may have.

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    In The News: Not-so-Extreme Makeover

    The New York Times reports that Snapple is not only changing their tea’s label font as well as the shape of their bottles — they are also axing high fructose corn syrup and replacing it with sugar.

    Although both sweeteners are equal from a caloric standpoint, high fructose corn syrup brings other issues to the table — genetically modified crops, unbalanced farm subsidies, and such low commodity prices for corn that it’s no wonder you can get 24 more ounces of soda for two additional pennies at any fast food joint!

    What’s most interesting, though, is that Snapple is also slightly decreasing the sweetness of its tea.

    This is the old ingredient list for Lemon Snapple Iced Tea:

    Water, high fructose corn syrup, citric acid, tea, natural flavors.

    Calories: 200.

    Here is the new ingredient list:

    Filtered water, sugar, citric acid, tea, natural flavors.

    Calories: 160.

    Reminder: the lower calories are not due to sugar being less caloric than high-fructose corn syrup.  The new Snapple formula simply contains fewer grams of added sugar.

    Unfortunately, thee lower-calorie news is counter-balanced by developments that bother me — the new Snapple bottles have the words “All natural” and “Made from green & black tea leaves” in larger font.

    Meanwhile, PepsiCo will roll out limited quantities of Pepsi Throwback and Mountain Dew Throwback in April.

    The selling point? A nostalgic logo and the replacement of high fructose corn syrup with sugar.

    Although calories — and sugar grams — will go unchanged, at least mercury contamination won’t be a concern.

    By the way, Pepsi Throwback is not a brand new idea — it takes several pages from England’s Pepsi Raw.

    The impetus behind all this? Easy — company executives are seeing consumer backlash to high fructose corn syrup and this is one way to prevent profit margins from shrinking.

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