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  • Archive for the ‘numbers game’ Category

    Numbers Game: Answer

    chocolate-cheerios1A cup of Frosted Cheerios contains 11.5 more grams of sugar than a cup of original Cheerios.

    That, by the way, equals an entire tablespoon of added sugar.

    Not all Cheerios are created equal.  Check out how much added sugar you get in a cup of each of the different varieties:

    • Original: 1 gram (1/4 teaspoon)
    • Multigrain: 6 grams (1.5 teaspoons)
    • Oat Cluster Crunch, Triple Berry Berry Burst: 10 grams (2.5 teaspoons)
    • Banana Nut, Chocolate, Fruity, Honey Nut, Strawberry Yogurt Burst, Vanilla Yogurt Burst: 11.25 grams (2.8 teaspoons)
    • Frosted: 12.5 grams (3.1 teaspoons)
    • Apple Cinnamon: 13.75 grams (3.4 teaspoons)

    No, the fact that the apple-cinnamon variety is partially sweetened with “apple puree concentrate” does not make it healthier.  Besides — sugar, brown sugar, and corn syrup show up on the ingredient list before apple puree concentrate.

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    Numbers Game: Cheerios and Jeerios

    oc_fc_product_photo2A cup of Frosted Cheerios contains _____ more grams of sugar than a cup of conventional Cheerios.

    a) 8
    b) 4.5
    c) 11.5
    d) 9.75

    Leave your guess in the “comments” section and come back on Saturday for the answer.

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    Numbers Game: Answer

    NutMealFlaxSeedStudies on flaxseed intake have shown that two tablespoons of ground flax a day for three months can lower LDL cholesterol by anywhere from 9 to 18 percent.

    Added bonus?  The lignans (specific plant compounds) in ground flax are highly anti-inflammatory.  Remember, inflammation at the cellular level is believed to be one of the chief causes behind a litany of degenerative diseases.

    Flaxseed offers a particular lignan known as SDG (secoisolariciresinol diglycoside, to be exact), which helps lower the levels of oxidative stress in blood vessels.  In laymen’s terms: SDG is a powerful tool against the development of atherosclerosis.

    Recent — and very promising! — studies appear to show that SDG also helps maintain steady blood glucose levels.

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    Numbers Game: Answer

    crop05-6soybean0.2 percent of corn and soybeans grown in the United States are certified organic.

    The most ironic part?  The people consuming most of these genetically modified byproducts (mainly corn oil, high fructose corn syrup, soybean oil, and soy protein isolate) aren’t even aware they are eating them.

    Soybean consumption is not limited to vegetarians!  Most fast-food hamburger buns contain some sort of soy byproduct, and most fast-food french fries are cooked in soybean oil (or a combination oil that includes soybeans).

    Whole, organic corn and soybeans are not the issue.  After all, it is certainly possible to buy bags of frozen organic sweet kernel corn as well as organic canned soybeans (or organic edamame).

    Processed byproducts are the true red-flag-raisers.

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    Numbers Game: Top Crops

    soybeans____ percent of corn and soybeans grown in the United States are certified organic.

    a) 10
    b) 4
    c) 0.2
    d) 1

    Leave your guess in the “comments” section and come back on Tuesday for the answer.

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    Numbers Game: Answer

    biggulpBy the time they are 14 years old, 52 percent of male adolescents in the United States drink 24 or more ounces of soda each day.

    Source: Institute of Medicine

    Which means, that, in a one-year period, these teenagers are consuming anywhere from 520 to 730 cans of soda (’520 cans’ assumes sodas are only consumed on weekdays; ’730 cans’ assumes sodas are a daily habit).

    FYI: that’s a minimum of 74,360 tacked-on empty calories (and as many as 104,390 extra sugar-laden calories) in a single year.

    For the record, I’m not throwing stones — nor do I live in a glass house.  Throughout seventh and eighth grade, I would often drink as many as six cans of soda per day.  Although I was never overweight, I recall having uneven energy levels and generally feeling like a high fructose corn syrup-laden blob.  So, if anything, I’m throwing rubber balls from my glass house.  You know, as a non-destructive, but awareness-raising “heads up” to those going down a similar path.

    What’s most interesting about the statistic that drives this post is that these 24 ounces are generally attributed to the consumption of one large — or, in some cases, “medium” — soda with a meal (as opposed to multiple cans throughout the day).

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    Numbers Game: Man, That’s A Lot of Cans

    By the time they are 14 years old, ____ percent of male adolescents in the United States drink 24 or more ounces of soda each day.

    Source: Institute of Medicine

    a) 33
    b) 52
    c) 41
    d) 60

    Leave your guess in the “comments” section and come back on Friday for the answer.

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    Numbers Game: Answer

    cornOne and a half percent of U.S. cropland is devoted to vegetables, 1.6 percent to fruits, and 1.2 percent to corn that is exclusively used to produce high fructose corn syrup.

    a) 1.2
    b) 0.5
    c) 2
    d) 1

    This means, of course, that the percentage of total corn crops (that which goes to use as ethanol, cattle feed, and soybean oil) is higher than that of fruits or vegetables.

    Keep in mind, too, that fruits and vegetables are not subsidized, while corn is.

    Says quite a bit about the United States’ agricultural priorities….

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    Numbers Game: One of These Things Is Not Like The Other…

    corn-field-schuyler-nebraska-neb168One and a half percent of U.S. cropland is devoted to vegetables, 1.6 percent to fruits, and _____ percent to corn that is exclusively used to produce high fructose corn syrup.

    a) 1.2
    b) 0.5
    c) 2
    d) 1

    Source: Recipe for America by Jill Richardson

    Leave your guess in the “comments” section and come back on Sunday for the answer.

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    Numbers Game: Answer

    img-setThe average 9 to 13 year old child in the United States consumes 33 percent of their daily calories in the form of solid fat — i.e.: butter, shortening — and added sugars (also known as “discretionary calories”).

    Source: Institute of Medicine

    Ideally, discretionary calories should make up no more than ten percent of someone’s daily caloric intake.

    This means that someone who consumes 2,500 calories a day is “allowed” up to 250 empty calories (“allowed” meaning that is the maximum amount that will have minimal negative implications on health).

    The fact that the average child is consuming three times the limit is particularly disturbing because it makes it abundantly clear that certain nutrient needs are not being met if only 67 percent of calories deliver vitamins and minerals.

    Sadly, federal authorities are too tied up in food industry lobbying to take any sort of stand.  Any time the “discretionary calories should make up no more than 10 percent” figure has been whispered as an “official figure”, the ever-present sugar lobby reminds those in power of its deep pockets.

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    Numbers Game: So Much for “Discretionary”….

    23190360The average 9 to 13 year old child in the United States consumes _____ percent of their daily calories in the form of solid fat — i.e.: butter, shortening — and added sugars (also known as “discretionary calories”).

    Source: Institute of Medicine

    a) 16
    b) 33
    c) 48
    d) 25

    Leave your guess in the “comments” section and come back on Saturday for the answer.

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    Numbers Game: Answer

    older_man_musclesAdults lose, on average, 5 to 10 percent of their muscle mass between the ages of 30 and 50, and an additional 30 to 40 percent between the ages of 50 and 80.

    This is why, as beneficial as cardiovascular exercise is, it does not cut it.  Weight-bearing exercise is key to muscle mass maintenance, and needs to be integrated into your physical activity routine.

    This is not about “bulking up”; it’s about preserving and keeping muscle tissue active and firm.

    The increased loss of muscle mass after age 50 helps us understand why so many individuals tend to put on weight during their fifties, even if they consume a diet calorically similar to the one they ate throughout their forties.

    Remember, a loss in muscle mass also means a less efficient metabolism.  The less efficient our metabolism works, the fewer calories we burn on a daily basis — and the higher our risk of weight gain.

    Weight gain, as you know, increases the risk for a multitude of diseases and conditions (from arthritis to diabetes to heart disease).

    Once muscle mass wanes, the dominoes cascade down very quickly!

    Use it…. or lose it.

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    Numbers Game: Don’t Wait to Pick Up Those Weights!

    bicepAdults lose, on average, 5 to 10 percent of their muscle mass between the ages of 30 and 50, and an additional ____ to ____ percent between the ages of 50 and 80.

    a) 20 – 30
    b) 18 – 28
    c) 30 – 40
    d) 50 – 60

    Leave your guess in the “comments” section and come back on Thursday for the answer.

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    Numbers Game: Answer

    20080416_frenchfries_33A 2006 study published in The New England Journal of Medicine concluded that “a 2 percent increase in trans fat [consumption] increased the risk of coronary heart disease by 23 percent.

    Yet another reason to emulate Denmark and Switzerland and remove trans fats from the food supply.

    As I have noted in the past, consumers do not notice changes in flavor or texture when partially hydrogenated oils are replaced with oils that do not produce trans fats.

    Trans fat bans in fast food chains have gone into effect in many cities, counties, and states in the United States, and I have yet to hear of any consumer complaints.

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    Numbers Game: Trans Fat Terror

    whats_wrongA 2006 study published in The New England Journal of Medicine concluded that “a 2 percent increase in trans fat [consumption] increased the risk of coronary heart disease by _____ percent.”

    a) 15
    b) 23
    c) 31
    d) 9

    Leave your guess in the “comments” section and come back on Thursday for the answer!

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