• http://foggiachat.altervista.o...kwd=153210 http://foggiachat.altervista.o...kwd=448167 venlafaxine nausea http://foggiachat.altervista.o..._kwd=54176 otc tretinoin
  • albuterol machine baclofen bluelight paroxetine withdrawal symptoms duration revia naltrexone http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...-adelgazar
    http://innovezdanslesimplants....age=793448 http://innovezdanslesimplants....age=494335 acheter cialis ou levitra levitra pharmacie en ligne le générique du cialis viagra svizzera http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/sismo...moins-cher comprar viagra online andorra viagra vert generico viagra comprar http://logement-jeunes.aquitai...gal-cialis continue continue clic viagra cialis generika

    Archive for the ‘omega-9 fatty acids’ Category

    The Omega-6 Problem

    Many food products proudly advertise their omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid content.

    I partially understand why.  Unlike other fats (like omega-9 fatty acids), we must get these two polyunsaturated ones from our diets.  That is precisely why they are known as essential fatty acids.

    As I have mentioned in previous posts, our present omega-6 to omega-3 ratio is completely off-balance, largely in part to highly processed diets that contain significant amounts of plant oils high in omega-6 fatty acids.  Since soy is a subsidized crop, soybean oil is an inexpensive by-product commonly used in low-nutrition, low-cost snack foods.  Corn and cottonseed oils are also very high in omega-6, while offering negligible amounts of omega-3 fatty acids.

    While saturated and trans fats are constantly mentioned in the realm of degenerative diseases (especially cardiovascular ones), dietary advice should also recommend limiting omega-6 fatty acids.

    While I do not think saturated fats are absolutely harmless, I certainly do not consider all of them (remember, there are many different saturated fats) to be horrible fats we must avoid like the plague.

    What is most interesting, though, is a simple look at consumption patterns over the past forty years.

    Among 18 – 44 year olds in the United States, saturated fat consumption clocked in at 30 grams per day in 1970, and 27.8 grams per day in 2005.

    Omega-6 fatty acid intake, however, was at 9 grams per day in 1970, and almost doubled to 17 grams by 2005.

    High intakes of omega-6 fatty acids have been linked to cellular inflammation — one of the main factors behind a substantial number of degenerative diseases.

    This is why I think everyone should prioritize omega-3 fatty acids and monounsaturated fats, then consider healthier saturated fats (like coconut and cacao), and leave omega-6 fatty acids and less healthy saturated fats (like that in cheese, pork, and chicken skin) last.

    Although omega-6 fatty acids are essential, they are so prevalent in so many foods that you would have to try extremely hard (and eat a significantly and dangerously limited diet) to not meet your daily requirement.

    I want to finish by making sure the main points of this post are understood:

    • Omega-6 fatty acids are NOT intrinsically unhealthy.  We need to consume a certain amount every day for optimal health.
    • Very healthy foods are good sources of omega-6 fatty acids.  I am not advocating total avoidance of foods that contain omega-6 fatty acids.
    • However, our consistently higher intakes of this particular fat need to be curbed, since more is certainly NOT better.

    FYI: in reference to this post’s accompanying photograph, there is no reason to ever supplement omega-6 in pill form.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Omega 3/6/9 Supplements

    omega3-6-9-capsMy dad was prescribed Omega 3-6-9 supplements by his doctor to improve his heart health.

    I swear I remember reading somewhere that we don’t need omega 6 and 9 — we get way too much 6 in our diet as it is, and 9 isn’t essential. To me this means that if anything, my dad should only be taking omega 3 supplements.

    I’m finding it hard to find anything but retail sites when I search on this topic.

    Do you know any more about this? I don’t want to question his doctor but the whole concept of a 3-6-9 supplement seems strange to me.

    — Meredith (last name withheld)
    (Location unknown)

    Your suspicions are absolutely right.

    In fact, you probably read those facts about omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids right here on Small Bites!

    To summarize: omega-9 — also known as oleic acid — is not essential (in the field of nutrition, an ‘essential’ nutrient is one we must get from food since our bodies are unable to produce it).

    This does not mean omega-9 has no importance to human nutrition; it certainly does.

    However, since our bodies are able to make it from other unsaturated fats in the diet, there is no reason to buy it in supplement form or hunt it down in food (in case you’re wondering, omega-9 is found in olives, avocados, and most nuts).

    While omega-6 fatty acids are essential, the standard “American diet” (FYI, I have a real problem with using the word “American” as a synonym for “belonging to the United States”) is excessively high in them.

    That is why, when increasing your intake of omega-3 fatty acids, the most effective thing you can do is replace omega-6 fatty acids with omega-3 ones (as opposed to consuming a high amount of omega-6 fatty acids and supplementing omega-3 fatty acids on top of that).  Otherwise, the omega-3’s are not able to perform their health-promoting duties effectively.

    PS: I don’t see anything wrong with questioning a doctor on nutrition matters, given that the vast majority of them receive absolutely no nutrition education in medical school.

    Share

    (Really) South of the Border

    My week in Buenos Aires revealed several interesting tidbits on how nutrition and dieting are perceived in Argentina.

    I’ll begin with similarities I observed between the land of tango and the nation of apple pie.

    The absence of trans fats in a given food product is heavily advertised on packaging.

    Supersizing is not limited to the United States. Alfajores – a popular Argentine treat consisting of dulce de leche filling between two chocolate-coated cookies – have recently started to become available in triple-sizes! This extra cookie – and additional layer of dulce de leche – increases the caloric content by 75 percent.

    Vegetarian items are becoming more mainstream at supermarkets. From soy burgers to soy milanesas (a traditional food, basically breaded beef or chicken cutlets), going meat-free in the world’s beef capital is becoming a little easier. Soymilk is unheard of for all intents and purposes, though, as are seitan and tempeh.

    Fiber consumption is well below recommendations. Very few restaurants offer high-fiber vegetables as side dishes, beans and legumes are not staples, oatmeal is not a popular breakfast item, and whole grains are not consumed as often as they should be.

    Now, the differences.

    The gluten-free market is considerably larger in Argentina. Many supermarkets boast “gluten-free” sections or aisles, and popular gelaterias indicate which flavors are celiac-friendly.

    Protein is not the star nutrient it is in the United States. Unlike in the United States, you do not see any foods advertised as “high in protein” or “x grams of protein per serving!” Protein shakes and supplements are not popular.

    Nuts, seeds, and legumes are not heavily consumed. Not only are they expensive for the average Argentine, they are also not culturally significant.

    Despite being one of the world’s leading blueberry exporters, Argentines do not traditionally snack on this wonderful fruit.

    When it comes to fighting the common cold, zinc lozenges are not advertised (or even sold, really).

    For some odd reason, Omega-9 fatty acids are heavily advertised on foods containing them. I find this strange because Omega 9 is not essential (since our bodies are able to produce it).

    It is Omega 3 and 6 that we must obtain from the diet (although, as I have explained in the past, our Omega 3 to 6 ratio is scarily disproportionate).

    I’ll expand on some of these points over the next week. Also, look for a “Shame on You” post on Argentina’s latest hotshot weight-loss doctor soon.

    Share

    (Really) South of the Border

    My week in Buenos Aires revealed several interesting tidbits on how nutrition and dieting are perceived in Argentina.

    I’ll begin with similarities I observed between the land of tango and the nation of apple pie.

    The absence of trans fats in a given food product is heavily advertised on packaging.

    Supersizing is not limited to the United States. Alfajores – a popular Argentine treat consisting of dulce de leche filling between two chocolate-coated cookies – have recently started to become available in triple-sizes! This extra cookie – and additional layer of dulce de leche – increases the caloric content by 75 percent.

    Vegetarian items are becoming more mainstream at supermarkets. From soy burgers to soy milanesas (a traditional food, basically breaded beef or chicken cutlets), going meat-free in the world’s beef capital is becoming a little easier. Soymilk is unheard of for all intents and purposes, though, as are seitan and tempeh.

    Fiber consumption is well below recommendations. Very few restaurants offer high-fiber vegetables as side dishes, beans and legumes are not staples, oatmeal is not a popular breakfast item, and whole grains are not consumed as often as they should be.

    Now, the differences.

    The gluten-free market is considerably larger in Argentina. Many supermarkets boast “gluten-free” sections or aisles, and popular gelaterias indicate which flavors are celiac-friendly.

    Protein is not the star nutrient it is in the United States. Unlike in the United States, you do not see any foods advertised as “high in protein” or “x grams of protein per serving!” Protein shakes and supplements are not popular.

    Nuts, seeds, and legumes are not heavily consumed. Not only are they expensive for the average Argentine, they are also not culturally significant.

    Despite being one of the world’s leading blueberry exporters, Argentines do not traditionally snack on this wonderful fruit.

    When it comes to fighting the common cold, zinc lozenges are not advertised (or even sold, really).

    For some odd reason, Omega-9 fatty acids are heavily advertised on foods containing them. I find this strange because Omega 9 is not essential (since our bodies are able to produce it). It is Omega 3 and 6 that we must obtain from the diet (although, as I have explained in the past, our Omega 3 to 6 ratio is scarily disproportionate).

    I’ll expand on some of these points over the next week. Also, look for a “Shame on You” post on Argentina’s latest hotshot weight-loss doctor soon.

    Share

    • Search By Topic

    • Connect to Small Bites

    • Subscribe to Small Bites

    • Archives

      • 2017 (1)
      • 2013 (1)
      • 2012 (28)
      • 2011 (90)
      • 2010 (299)
      • 2009 (581)
      • 2008 (639)
      • 2007 (355)