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    Archive for the ‘ostrich’ Category

    You Ask, I Answer: Ostrich Eggs

    Do ostrich eggs offer the same nutrients as eggs laid by hens?

    — Joelle Numberg
    (city withheld), AZ

    Let me guess — this question was inspired by this week’s Top Chef episode?

    For those of you who don’t watch that wonderful Bravo reality show, contestants were asked to reinvent classic American dishes, and one not-too-methodical participant decided to make a quiche with ostrich eggs despite never having cooked with them.

    This move led to her elimination at the end of the episode.

    So, apart from destroying reality show contestants’ runs, what else do ostrich eggs offer?

    The main selling point is that they are significantly lower in cholesterol — and a bit lower in saturated fat — than their chicken counterparts.

    Keep in mind that one ostrich egg is equal to two dozen of the chicken variety, so you must always remember to divide.

    The 2,000 calories contained on a single ostrich egg isn’t at all outrageous when you divide by 24 and get 83 calories — a mere six more calories than your standard chicken egg.

    Vitamin and mineral composition is nearly identical, although ostrich eggs offer lower levels of vitamin A and slightly more magnesium.

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    You Ask, I Answer: Ostrich/Bison Meats

    An “upscale” burger place I like to go to offers ostrich and bison meat.

    I like the taste of both and have heard they are better for you than beef.

    Is that true?

    — Robert (last name withheld)
    New York, NY

    Ostrich (popular in Asia and Southern Africa) and bison/buffalo meats are considered a rarity in the United States.

    In case you’re having a Jessica Simpson moment, remember that buffalo wings are made from chicken (they originated in the city of Buffalo, hence the name.)

    Compared to traditional (cow’s) red meat, both of these options are healthier alternatives.

    Whereas three ounces of beef clock in at 240 calories and 15 grams of fat, that same amount of ostrich adds up to 97 calories and 1.3 grams of fat, while three ounces of bison contain 140 calories and 2.5 grams of fat.

    Since bison subsist only on grass — the overwhelming majority of cows in the United States are on a literally lethal corn-based diet — their meat offers low amounts of saturated fat and higher levels of Conjugated Linoleic Acid.

    Although ostriches do not eat grass, their meat is very lean since fat builds up outside their muscle tissue, making it very easy to remove prior to cooking.

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