• disulfiram buy orlistat buy online baclofen generic brand topamax 75 mg azithromycin 1 gm
  • http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...erol-vials prednisolone half life azithromycin liquid antabuse or naltrexone trimethoprim 100mg
    cialis sur internet danger http://innovezdanslesimplants....age=715334 levitra achat france medicament cialis pour femme cialis generic belgique http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/sismo...s-generico preise viagra deutschland http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/sismo...gra-kaufen http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/sismo...spa%C3%B1a comprar viagra generico toile kamagra tadalis aller web aller

    Archive for the ‘Thanksgiving’ Category

    You Ask, I Answer: Tryptophan

    I am writing to you so you can hopefully help me prove a point.

    My cousin claims the reason why people feel tired after Thanksgiving dinner is because of the tryptophan in turkey.

    I say that’s a myth.

    She insists it has been “scientifically proven” that tryptophan makes you sleepy.

    What do you have to say?

    — Lori Narth
    (Location withheld)

    Ah, yes, the “turkey makes you sleepy” myth. Let’s break this one down.

    Tryptophan is one of twenty amino acids (and one of nine essential amino acids which we must get from food.)

    Tryptophan also happens to be a pre-cursor for serotonin (a neurotransmitter) and melatonin (a hormone), which play significant roles in the regulation of sleep.

    That might make you think there is a direct link between the tryptophan in your turkey dinner and your desire to nap a short while later.

    Not so much.

    First of all, although tryptophan is one amino acid in turkey, it is also found in other foods.

    In fact, chicken breast, tuna, soybeans, and beef contain more tryptophan than turkey! Snapper, black beans, and cod are also good sources of this amino acid.

    More importantly, tryptophan is one of many amino acids contained in a Thanksgiving dinner.

    This means tryptophan is competing with other similar compounds for absorption by the brain. Simply put, you aren’t getting enough of it to make you sleepy.

    Research has shown you would have to eat a significant amount of turkey — almost the entire bird! — on an empty stomach to feel any sleep-inducing effects.

    A much more accurate theory for the sleepiness after Thanksgiving dinner has to do with the sheer amount of food eaten.

    With that much food to digest, the body sends as much blood as it can to the intestinal tract, resulting in an energy zap.

    This is the main reason behind the “small meals throughout the day” recommendation — by not overworking your digestive system at any given time, your energy level is more likely to remain steady.

    Remember, too, that most Thanksgiving meals include white bread, mashed potatoes, and cranberry sauce.

    Those are precisely the kind of carbohydrates that make blood sugar levels rise and fall rather sharply, making for a more noticeable “energy crash.”

    It is also a known fact that meals high in carbohydrate increase insulin levels, consequently increasing the amount of serotonin produced by the body.

    I also think people forget that the buildup to such events (traveling to someone’s house, preparing the food, and being socially “on”) can be rather tiresome in and of itself.

    Share

    Numbers Game: Answer

    According to figures by Consumer Insight, the average Thanksgiving dinner (three ounces of turkey with gravy + one serving of mashed potatoes + one serving of cranberry sauce + one serving of candied yams + one serving of green bean casserole + a slice of pumpkin pie + two bread rolls with butter) adds up to 2,777 calories and 90 grams of fat.

    Yes, just one meal provides approximately a day and a half’s worth of calories and fat for most people.

    It isn’t too far-fetched, then, to say that on Thanksgiving Day, many people can take in almost 4,000 calories.

    One huge mistake I see many people make on holidays like Thanksgiving is starving all day (or follow non-sensical rules like “I will eat nothing but celery sticks until dinner”) in anticipation of a huge meal where high-calorie foods are at their disposal.

    End result? Gorging and bingeing all through dinner (and taking in more calories in one sitting than they would have had they eaten sensibly throughout the day) followed by some unrealistic diet goal announcement like, “that’s it. Tomorrow it’s nothing but chicken broth and grapes.”

    The best thing you can do before sitting down to a meal where overindulgence seems imminent is to prepare yourself.

    Approximately forty five minutes to an hour before dinner, snack on foods containing fiber, healthy fats, and protein.

    Some good pre-Thanksgiving dinner snacks include a handful of nuts, a Lara/Clif Nectar/Pure bar, whole grain crackers with hummus, and a bowl of whole grain cereal with raisins or a banana.

    If you can make it to the dinner table without starving and wanting seconds of everything, you can enjoy your meal without overloading on calories.

    Besides, you know as well as I do that slices of those tempting pies — along with every other dish — will be in the fridge tomorrow (and the day after, and the week after that). There is no need to shove it down if, by the end of dinner, you already feel like a Macy’s parade balloon.

    Also, find ways to make classic dishes healthier.

    Serve whole wheat rolls with trans-fat-free margarine, opt for oven-roasted potatoes and sweet potatoes drizzled with olive oil and topped with chopped rosemary in place of mashed potatoes, and check out this delicious low-fat pumpkin recipe made with a whole grain crust!

    Share

    • Search By Topic

    • Connect to Small Bites

    • Subscribe to Small Bites

    • Archives

      • 2017 (1)
      • 2013 (1)
      • 2012 (28)
      • 2011 (90)
      • 2010 (299)
      • 2009 (581)
      • 2008 (639)
      • 2007 (355)