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    Archive for the ‘weight watchers’ Category

    You Ask, I Answer: Ice Milk

    Have you heard of, or know much about, ice milk?

    I think Weight Watchers promotes it.

    — Katie P.
    (Location unknown)

    Ice milk is the outdated term for what we now call “low fat ice cream.”

    The name change occurred as a result of new FDA labeling laws in 1994.

    Four years later, milk underwent similar changes, with 2% officially changing its name to “reduced-fat” and 1% being renamed “low-fat.”

    I don’t understand why Weight Watchers would specifically suggest participants seek out ice milk, since that term is literally extinct.

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    In The News: Dieting, 2008 Style

    As this New York Times article explains, some of the latest diet advertisements and campaigns were launched minutes into the new year.

    The Special K line — one of my least favorites — spent a good penny on expensive billboards in New York City’s Times Square.

    Not only are most of their products very artificial tasting (especially the snack/meal replacement bars), I find the entire campaign to be misleading and irresponsibly branded.

    Kellogg’s wants consumers to believe that its Special K cereals are the magic solution to weight loss. In reality, their “drop ten pounds by eating our cereal” campaign is all about reducing calories (instead of a standard 500 calorie lunch, eat a 180 calorie bowl of cereal).

    I side with the Weight Watchers folks. Per the article:

    “The campaign’s tagline, “Stop Dieting. Start Living,” is meant to emphasize a more sensible approach to weight loss than the ever popular crash diet. The print ads, with headlines like “Go on a Diet Diet” and “Di*t,” will run through the first quarter of 2008 in publications ranging from entertainment magazines to Time and Newsweek.

    Cheryl Callan, the director for marketing of Weight Watchers, said the company wants potential customers to “think in terms of a really successful path through a change in lifestyle and not through dieting.”

    Meanwhile, I can’t wait to see what new diet products, fads, and trends will come our way this year.

    2008 hasn’t started off on the best foot.

    January 1 saw the release of Kellogg’s mixed berry protein water. Not only is protein consumed in excessive amounts in the United States; it also adds unnecessary calories to a product that naturally contains zero.

    Share

    In The News: Dieting, 2008 Style

    As this New York Times article explains, some of the latest diet advertisements and campaigns were launched minutes into the new year.

    The Special K line — one of my least favorites — spent a good penny on expensive billboards in New York City’s Times Square.

    Not only are most of their products very artificial tasting (especially the snack/meal replacement bars), I find the entire campaign to be misleading and irresponsibly branded.

    Kellogg’s wants consumers to believe that its Special K cereals are the magic solution to weight loss. In reality, their “drop ten pounds by eating our cereal” campaign is all about reducing calories (instead of a standard 500 calorie lunch, eat a 180 calorie bowl of cereal).

    I side with the Weight Watchers folks. Per the article:

    “The campaign’s tagline, “Stop Dieting. Start Living,” is meant to emphasize a more sensible approach to weight loss than the ever popular crash diet. The print ads, with headlines like “Go on a Diet Diet” and “Di*t,” will run through the first quarter of 2008 in publications ranging from entertainment magazines to Time and Newsweek.

    Cheryl Callan, the director for marketing of Weight Watchers, said the company wants potential customers to “think in terms of a really successful path through a change in lifestyle and not through dieting.”

    Meanwhile, I can’t wait to see what new diet products, fads, and trends will come our way this year.

    2008 hasn’t started off on the best foot.

    January 1 saw the release of Kellogg’s mixed berry protein water. Not only is protein consumed in excessive amounts in the United States; it also adds unnecessary calories to a product that naturally contains zero.

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Weight Watchers

    I was [talking to a friend today about] how fad diets don’t work, because you deprive your body of calories for a short time, and the weight comes back on. But [she] was saying she does Weight Watchers, and she doesn’t consider it to be a ‘fad’ diet because she’s lost weight and kept it off, and eats balanced meals.

    I’m torn, because Weight Watchers seems like a big ol’ scam to me. What do you think?

    — Anonymous (per writer’s request)

    I agree with your friend — Weight Watchers is most certainly not a “fad” diet.

    What I like about Weight Watchers is that, above all, they stress calorie and portion control. Additionally, their famous “point” system (used to determine how many calories you should be taking in) is determined by taking into account a variety of factors, including weight, age, and physical activity level.

    Unlike many fat diets, the Weight Watcher program does not suggest anyone eliminate entire food groups from the diet or deprive themselves.

    Their belief — which I agree with — is that there is no such thing as “good” or “bad” food. Instead, you should strive for balance and watch your calories and portions. THAT is the key to successful and permanent weight loss.

    Banning flour or sugar for life is not only impractical, it also does not guarantee permanent weight loss (you could get extra calories from fats or sugar-free candy and still gain weight).

    Additionally, Weight Watchers recognizes emotional patterns and support systems as crucial pasts of a successful weight-loss system.

    I also like the idea of meetings — at least initially — as a way of providing supportive environments for people. At the same time, I am glad they now offer an online program to people who dislike — or are unable to attend — meetings.

    My only “concern” with Weight Watchers is that they now sell a lot of processed products (cupcakes, muffins, cereals, etc.) that, while low in calories, drown out what I believe is the better suggestion of “eating close to nature”.

    As an occassional treat, they are suitable choices, but I find them to be loaded with preservatives and very artificial tasting.

    If anyone were to ask me what popular “diet program” I would recommend, Weight Watchers would be one of my top choices, hands down.

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