• tretinoin prescription http://foggiachat.altervista.o...kwd=228820 trimethoprim tablet http://foggiachat.altervista.o..._kwd=21018 http://foggiachat.altervista.o...kwd=610823
  • fluconazole 150 mg http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...icillin-mg finasteride tablets http://www.nanoqam.uqam.ca/ico...n-for-acne valacyclovir ingredients
    homme pharmacie fr achat levitra levitra pas cher pharmacie commander cialis generique en france http://innovezdanslesimplants....age=477443 http://innovezdanslesimplants....age=458239 http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/sismo...-du-viagra cialis vendita italia http://www.cricyt.edu.ar/sismo...s-generico cialis generico in contrassegno in italia viagra rezept kosten acquisto viagra svizzera aller montrer trouve qui

    Archive for the ‘zeaxanthin’ Category

    You Ask, I Answer: Arugula

    arugula1219364897There are few things I love more than arugula salads.

    Is arugula as healthy as other leafy green vegetables?

    — Dan Christom
    (Location withheld)

    I, too, love arugula’s peppery flavor.

    Something else worthy of affection?  Its stellar nutritional profile!

    A cup and a half (the amount typically used as a salad base) offers 15% of the Daily Value of vitamin A and almost half a day’s worth of vitamin K.

    Arugula also delivers decent amounts of folate and vitamin C.

    Remember, however, that vitamins and minerals are only half the tale.

    Arugula is a very good source of many phytonutrients, including lutein and zeaxanthin (two powerhouses that fight macular degeneration).

    Another bonus?  Arugula belongs to the cruciferous vegetable family (where it counts broccoli, kale, and mustard greens as relatives).  High intakes of these vegetables (five to six times a week) are associated with reduced risk of cervical, colon, lung, and prostate cancer.

    PS: I often like to add a small amount of arugula to pesto for a unique flavor boost!

    Share

    You Ask, I Answer: Egg Yolk

    I heard somewhere that you should keep the yolk when eating eggs as you don’t absorb the protein without it.

    I know the yolk has the highest concentration of protein but I always assumed that egg whites are also a source of protein, albeit less than a whole egg.

    Can you clarify?

    — Lori (last name withheld)
    Ottawa, Ontario

    Although egg yolks contain some protein (approximately 42% of an egg’s total protein content), egg whites contain more.

    Additionally, whereas egg yolks are a mix of protein and fat, egg whites are almost entirely made up of protein.

    You do not need to eat egg yolk in order to absorb the protein in egg whites.

    That is not to say the egg yolk is useless. It’s a wonderful source of folate, vitamin A, choline, and the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin.

    Share

    • Search By Topic

    • Connect to Small Bites

    • Subscribe to Small Bites

    • Archives

      • 2017 (1)
      • 2013 (1)
      • 2012 (28)
      • 2011 (90)
      • 2010 (299)
      • 2009 (581)
      • 2008 (639)
      • 2007 (355)